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I know there are already many posts on still and yet, but I really find it difficult to use them as conjunction as in following sentences:

  1. It's a small car, yet/still it's surprisingly spacious
  2. He has a good job, and yet/still he never seems to have any money
  3. The weather was cold and wet. yet/still, we had a great time.

So my question is when should I use yet and when should I use still, when using it as a conjunction, and what is the correct option for sentences above?

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    I believe some people have a stylistic preference for and yet over yet at the beginning of a clause, but I can't find a reference. Somehow and yet sounds better (especially at the beginning of a sentence). – Cerberus_Reinstate_Monica Apr 23 '13 at 22:41
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    1b (with 'still') requires a semicolon. 3a (with 'Yet') does not have the comma. – Edwin Ashworth Apr 7 '16 at 11:45
  • See also: english.stackexchange.com/questions/129115/… – user414952 Mar 3 at 15:14
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Yet is a conjunction meaning nevertheless or however. While still may appear in conjunctive phrases like but still, it is not itself a conjunction. Therefore:

It's a small car, yet it's surprisingly spacious.

The weather was cold and wet, yet we had a great time.

You can use either word in conjunctive phrases. Yet usually carries a sense of negation, so and yet means the same thing as but still.

He has a good job, and yet he never seems to have any money.

He has a good job, but still he never seems to have any money.

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    As an adverb, yet is an NPI, so it's not surprising that it invokes a negative feel. As a conjunction, it's a version of but that falutes slightly higher, and can indicate a slightly different version of surprise. Compare sadder but wiser with sadder yet wiser. – John Lawler Apr 23 '13 at 22:23
  • 'Still' is also used as a conjunctive adverb cf 'however'. It's a small car, yet it's surprisingly spacious. // It's a small car; however, it's surprisingly spacious. It's a small car; still, it's surprisingly spacious – Edwin Ashworth Mar 3 at 14:27
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I agree. Yet means however and still. We can put 'and' before it. Sentences include:

I bought ice cream on a freezing winter's day, yet it still melted.

Yet shows contrast between two statements.

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  • Hello, chile. ELU expects supporting references, linked and attributed, to back up claims (even when correct). Also, OP gives three double examples. // If 'yet means however', does this mean that 'The weather was cold and wet. However, we had a great time.' may be written 'The weather was cold and wet. Yet, we had a great time.'? – Edwin Ashworth Feb 14 at 20:09

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