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I have a question about the use of the word to as a time proposition. Is to inclusive in the following sentence?

I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013.

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It's ambiguous.

Some may read it as including April 2013, others may not. I'd probably read it as inclusive.

American English uses the inclusive word through:

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 through April 2013.

For unambiguous British English, add extra wording:

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013, inclusive.

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 through to April 2013.

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 up to and including April 2013.

| improve this answer | |
  • What about the to in "through to" ? – mplungjan Apr 22 '13 at 13:35
  • @mplungjan: American uses "through". British uses "to" but it's ambiguous so "through to" is a British compromise that doesn't sound too weird and American. – Hugo Apr 22 '13 at 13:44
  • From a British perspective, it's not really necessary to add those extra wordings. They come across as unnecessarily formal and long-winded. It would be much simpler and more natural as I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013 or I worked at company X from April 2012 until April 2013. – Tristan Apr 22 '13 at 15:20

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