-1

Which form is better to use?

  • He made a picture of his sister.
  • He has made a picture of his sister.

And why?

The situation in which I want to use it is as follows. This is my first sentence. No background or conversation was done before. I don't know the person I am talking to and neither does he. We see each other for the first time. Also he doesn't know my sister or anything like that.

  • 1
    Can you provide more of the context? Just like that both are correct. Also, you might want to try this site: ell.stackexchange.com/questions – fluffy Apr 14 '13 at 8:37
  • Why more information? There are only two states "0" or "1". 0 = Image doesn't exist. 1 = Image does exist. I am talking about the state "1". No other speculations are needed. So, which tense would you suggest in this case? – Derfder Apr 14 '13 at 9:18
  • This question has been asked, and answered, dozens of times before. We even have a dedicated tag. Please search the site before asking. Thank you. – RegDwigнt Apr 14 '13 at 10:47
2

"He made a picture of his sister." is what you'll more frequently run into in the U.S., regardless of the context.

"He has made a picture of his sister" doesn't run off the tongue very easily. The only situation that would really be used is if a child just drew a picture and someone was immediately commenting on it. Even then, it would be wierd if a contraction wasn't in place.

"Look what he did! He's made a picture of his sister!"

I'm mainly talking about conversational English, but this would apply to written work as well.

| improve this answer | |
2

The first places the making of the picture at a specific time in the past. The second suggests that the picture was made quite recently and that that fact is relevant to what has gone on previously in the conversation.

| improve this answer | |
  • So which one to use? – Derfder Apr 14 '13 at 9:13
  • It depends on what has gone on previously in the conversation. – Barrie England Apr 14 '13 at 9:20
  • Nothing. This is my first sentence. I don't know the person and he doesn't know me or my sister or any other background. – Derfder Apr 14 '13 at 9:21
  • It still depends on the context. – Barrie England Apr 14 '13 at 9:33
  • Here is the context: This is my first sentence. No background or conversation was done before. I don't know the person I am talking to and neither does he. We see each other for the first time. Also he doesn't know my sister or anything like that. – Derfder Apr 14 '13 at 9:38

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.