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“Well then, Jane, call to aid your fancy:—suppose you were no longer a girl well reared and disciplined, but a wild boy indulged from childhood upwards; imagine yourself in a remote foreign land. . .” (Jane Eyre)

What’s the meaning of ‘call’ in the highlighted part? Does it mean ‘come to aid your fancy’?

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"Now, my little friend, while the sun drinks the dew--while all the flowers in this old garden awake and expand, and the birds fetch their young ones' breakfast out of the Thornfield, and the early bees do their first spell of work--I'll put a case to you, which you must endeavour to suppose your own: but first, look at me, and tell me you are at ease, and not fearing that I err in detaining you, or that you err in staying."

"No, sir; I am content."

"Well then, Jane, call to aid your fancy:- suppose you were no longer a girl well reared and disciplined, but a wild boy indulged from childhood upwards; imagine yourself in a remote foreign land; conceive that you there commit a capital error, no matter of what nature or from what motives, but one whose consequences must follow you through life and taint all your existence.

I read this as "Now try to use your imagination"

fancy

a mental image or conception: He had happy fancies of being a famous actor.

I am not the only one to think so: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2605963 Also yours I believe...

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