14

Examples:

  1. Data can be imported to and exported from the application.
  2. Data can be imported and exported from the application.
  3. Data can be imported to the application and exported from it.

  1. The manager defined the products that should be added to and removed from the store.
  2. The manager defined the products that should be added and removed from the store.
  3. The manager defined the products that should be added to the store and removed from it.

I assume that the third sentence is correct in my examples. My question is whether the two other sentences are correct.

11

Examples #1 is correct in both sections, and are examples of basic parallelism. However, example #2 is wrong is both sections.

The basic test is if you can deconstruct your parallelism into two grammatical sentences without adding new words:

Example #1 works

Data can be imported to and exported from the application.

deconstructs to

Data can be imported to the application. Data can be exported from the application.

Example #2 is awkward

Data can be imported and exported from the application.

deconstructs to

Data can be imported from the application.
Data can be exported from the application.

Note the "import from" wordage above. This is awkward because the idiom here is "import to the application" or "export from the application". Even worse is the idea of adding something "from" a store.

3

In both examples, (1) is also an accepted structure, although it is usually written with commas or dashes:

Data can be imported to, and exported from, the application.

  • 4
    I would only use commas or dashes if the second verb–preposition pair is to be read as a parenthetical remark or an afterthought. I see no reason to add punctuation otherwise. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 11 '13 at 1:03

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