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All I know is this, which is not very much:

1610s, originally a small book meant to be carried in one’s pocket, from pocket + book. Meaning “a booklike leather folder for papers, bills, etc.” is from 1722. Meaning "a woman's purse" is from 1816.

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pocketbook

An extremely speculative hypothesis about its origin: perhaps "book" was misheard as "bag", or "book" was pronounced much like "bag" in some 1800s dialect or accent, leading to this odd usage of "pocketbook". Then again, it might as well be ordinary metonymy, where head and modifier are reservedreversed: *bookpocket would be a perfectly logical word that made sense, if it existed.

All I know is this, which is not very much:

1610s, originally a small book meant to be carried in one’s pocket, from pocket + book. Meaning “a booklike leather folder for papers, bills, etc.” is from 1722. Meaning "a woman's purse" is from 1816.

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pocketbook

An extremely speculative hypothesis about its origin: perhaps "book" was misheard as "bag", or "book" was pronounced much like "bag" in some 1800s dialect or accent, leading to this odd usage of "pocketbook". Then again, it might as well be ordinary metonymy, where head and modifier are reserved: *bookpocket would be a perfectly logical word that made sense, if it existed.

All I know is this, which is not very much:

1610s, originally a small book meant to be carried in one’s pocket, from pocket + book. Meaning “a booklike leather folder for papers, bills, etc.” is from 1722. Meaning "a woman's purse" is from 1816.

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pocketbook

An extremely speculative hypothesis about its origin: perhaps "book" was misheard as "bag", or "book" was pronounced much like "bag" in some 1800s dialect or accent, leading to this odd usage of "pocketbook". Then again, it might as well be ordinary metonymy, where head and modifier are reversed: *bookpocket would be a perfectly logical word that made sense, if it existed.

1
source | link

All I know is this, which is not very much:

1610s, originally a small book meant to be carried in one’s pocket, from pocket + book. Meaning “a booklike leather folder for papers, bills, etc.” is from 1722. Meaning "a woman's purse" is from 1816.

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pocketbook

An extremely speculative hypothesis about its origin: perhaps "book" was misheard as "bag", or "book" was pronounced much like "bag" in some 1800s dialect or accent, leading to this odd usage of "pocketbook". Then again, it might as well be ordinary metonymy, where head and modifier are reserved: *bookpocket would be a perfectly logical word that made sense, if it existed.