5 deleted 5 characters in body
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Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people prefer an adverb - simple verb pair than an overly fancy and obscure verb containing given quality.

Avoid them when they cheaply skipreplace a descriptive expression or replace a verb that pinpoints given quality.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people prefer an adverb - simple verb pair than an overly fancy and obscure verb containing given quality.

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression or replace a verb that pinpoints given quality.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people prefer an adverb - simple verb pair than an overly fancy and obscure verb containing given quality.

Avoid them when they cheaply replace a descriptive expression or a verb that pinpoints given quality.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

4 added 67 characters in body
source | link

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people would prefer "I sincerely assure"an adverb - simple verb pair than an overly fancy and obscure verb containing given quality.

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression or replace a verb that pinpoints given quality.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people would prefer "I sincerely assure".

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people prefer an adverb - simple verb pair than an overly fancy and obscure verb containing given quality.

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression or replace a verb that pinpoints given quality.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

3 asseverate
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Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people would prefer "I sincerely assure".

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality.

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

Some cooks hate garlic. That doesn't mean garlic is bad. That in order doesn't mean eating raw garlic before a job interview is a good idea.

The rule of thumb is "do not make up adverbs".

Do use adverbs if they concisely convey a specific quality, better than a more expressive verb would. I asseverate most people would prefer "I sincerely assure".

Avoid them when they cheaply skip a descriptive expression.

Do not use them at all if you avoidantly try to replace whole sentences with them, or redundantly repeat the sense of the verb they describe. You are able to make up adverbs impunitively, or abuse obscurely occurring ones, or arbitrarily give them new meanings, but don't do it. It's bad.

2 redundantly repeat
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