3 Found more reputable grammar sources to cite!
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The question is "Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?"

Yes. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text. For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text that consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuationproper punctuation:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
         Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or this news headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

The grammar reference source, Scribendi, advises that thisThis is proper usage in the U.S. and Canada. It is familiar to me.

However, for British and Australian usage British and Australian usage may be different, Scribendi informedsuch that the roles of single and double quotation marks are reversed. In other words, use double quotation marks on the nested text, and single quote marks to enclose the entire passage. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
         Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

*** Be aware that this partThe choice of the question,

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. "Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

quotation marks for nesting is incorrectnot a hard and fast rule though. It should be is sufficient as long as usage is consistent, and observes either form of nesting.

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

The question is "Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?"

Yes. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text. For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text that consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuation:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
         Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or this news headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

The grammar reference source, Scribendi, advises that this is proper usage in the U.S. and Canada. It is familiar to me.

However, for British and Australian usage, Scribendi informed that the roles of single and double quotation marks are reversed. In other words, use double quotation marks on the nested text, and single quote marks to enclose the entire passage. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
         Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

*** Be aware that this part of the question,

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. "Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

is incorrect. It should be

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

The question is "Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?"

Yes. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text. For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text that consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuation:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
         Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or this news headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

This is proper usage in the U.S. and Canada. It is familiar to me. British and Australian usage may be different, such that the roles of single and double quotation marks are reversed. In other words, use double quotation marks on the nested text, and single quote marks to enclose the entire passage. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
         Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

The choice of quotation marks for nesting is not a hard and fast rule though. It is sufficient as long as usage is consistent, and observes either form of nesting.

2 corrected wrong URL, missing words, format errors. etc.
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The question is "Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?"

Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?

Yes, there is. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text.

  For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text that consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuation in the U.S. and Canada:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
         Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or from this news headlinenews headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

The grammar reference source, Scribendi says, advises that quoting within a quotation (or nesting) requires single quotation marksthis is proper usage in the U.S. and Canada, which. It is what I am familiar withto me. 

However, for British and Australian usage, it saidScribendi informed that the roles of single and double quotation marks are used for dialogue or any quotation, so that when there is nestingreversed. In other words, use double quotation marks on the nested text, and single quote marks to enclose the entire passage. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
            Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

*** Be aware that this part of the question,

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. "Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

is incorrect. It should be

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

The question is

Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?

Yes, there is. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text.

  For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuation in the U.S. and Canada:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
   Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or from this news headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

The source, Scribendi says that quoting within a quotation (or nesting) requires single quotation marks in the U.S. and Canada, which is what I am familiar with. However, for British and Australian usage, it said that single quotation marks are used for dialogue or any quotation, so that when there is nesting, use double quotation marks on the nested text. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
            Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

*** Be aware that this part of the question,

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. "Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

is incorrect. It should be

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

The question is "Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?"

Yes. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text. For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text that consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuation:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
         Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or this news headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

The grammar reference source, Scribendi, advises that this is proper usage in the U.S. and Canada. It is familiar to me. 

However, for British and Australian usage, Scribendi informed that the roles of single and double quotation marks are reversed. In other words, use double quotation marks on the nested text, and single quote marks to enclose the entire passage. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
         Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

*** Be aware that this part of the question,

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. "Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

is incorrect. It should be

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

1
source | link

The question is

Are there any other rules for quotes in use for dialogue that I have missed?

Yes, there is. In the case of nested quotes, matched single quotes should be used for the innermost text.

For example, if one wants to quote a passage of text consists partially, but not entirely of dialogue, this would be the proper punctuation in the U.S. and Canada:

"'Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'  
   Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"

or from this news headline, freshly posted by The Wall Street Journal a few moments ago (if I were to want to quote it):

"Justices Probe 'Alien Tort' Law"

The source, Scribendi says that quoting within a quotation (or nesting) requires single quotation marks in the U.S. and Canada, which is what I am familiar with. However, for British and Australian usage, it said that single quotation marks are used for dialogue or any quotation, so that when there is nesting, use double quotation marks on the nested text. In the example above, that would be:

'"Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
            Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."'

and similarly

'Justices Probe "Alien Tort" Law'

*** Be aware that this part of the question,

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. "Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."

is incorrect. It should be

"I am going to talk for a long time, and tell the story of my life all the way until today, but I could also tell you about today if you like. Or maybe not. Let me just get on with it."