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The term used in the UK is Hobson's choice. It has its origin in one Tobias Hobson who let out horses, and is said, in the OED, 'to have compelled customers to take the horse which happened to be next the stable-door, or go without.'

If not choosing either is not an option, then you might be speaking simply of a dilemma, 'A choice between two (or, loosely, several) alternatives, which are or appear equally unfavourable' (OED).

The term used in the UK is Hobson's choice. It has its origin in one Tobias Hobson who let out horses, and is said, in the OED, 'to have compelled customers to take the horse which happened to be next the stable-door, or go without.'

The term used in the UK is Hobson's choice. It has its origin in one Tobias Hobson who let out horses, and is said, in the OED, 'to have compelled customers to take the horse which happened to be next the stable-door, or go without.'

If not choosing either is not an option, then you might be speaking simply of a dilemma, 'A choice between two (or, loosely, several) alternatives, which are or appear equally unfavourable' (OED).

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The term used in the UK is Hobson's choice. It has its origin in one Tobias Hobson who let out horses, and is said, in the OED, 'to have compelled customers to take the horse which happened to be next the stable-door, or go without.'