4 Removed clunky reference, thanks to user "mungflesh" for suggesting an edit.
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It means “grasping at straws”, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless
to make a futile attempt at something
trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work
trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According toThe idiom this pageoriginated, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

It means “grasping at straws”, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless
to make a futile attempt at something
trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work
trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

It means “grasping at straws”, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless
to make a futile attempt at something
trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work
trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

The idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

3 formatting
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It means grasping at strawsgrasping at straws, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless

to
to make a futile attempt at something

trying
trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work

trying
trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

It means grasping at straws, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless

to make a futile attempt at something

trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work

trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

It means grasping at straws, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless
to make a futile attempt at something
trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work
trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

2 added 158 characters in body
source | link

It means grasping at straws, which is the more common variationthe more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless

to make a futile attempt at something

trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work

trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

It means grasping at straws, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless

to make a futile attempt at something

trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work

trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

It means grasping at straws, which is the more common variation on the idiom. From the linked source:

to depend on something that is useless

to make a futile attempt at something

trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work

trying to find reasons to feel hopeful about a bad situation

According to this page, the idiom originated with Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).

1
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