2 added definition of disgruntle
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I've heard the term clock-watcher used to describe people who keep one eye on the clock each day, eagerly awaiting quitting time (which can never arrive too soon). Collins says:

clock-watcher: an employee who checks the time in anticipation of a break or of the end of the working day.

It's not a precise fit, because not all clock watchers are disinterested in their job and unhappy with management. But many such disgruntled employees cope by becoming clock-watchers.

So, maybe disgruntled is a better fit? Obviously, disgruntled can be applied to more than just laborers who are unhappy at work (disgruntled spouse, disgruntled fans, e.g.), but the word is used in that context very often. If you scan through the usage examples on the right-hand side of the Wordnik page, you'll see that, more often than not, the word is being used to describe someone unhappy with their job.

disgruntle: To make discontented or dissatisfied; to disappoint; to throw into a state of sulky dissatisfaction: usually in the participial adjective disgruntled.

P.S. You asked for a word or expression – maybe disgruntled clockwatcher could work?

I've heard the term clock-watcher used to describe people who keep one eye on the clock each day, eagerly awaiting quitting time (which can never arrive too soon). Collins says:

clock-watcher: an employee who checks the time in anticipation of a break or of the end of the working day.

It's not a precise fit, because not all clock watchers are disinterested in their job and unhappy with management. But many such disgruntled employees cope by becoming clock-watchers.

So, maybe disgruntled is a better fit? Obviously, disgruntled can be applied to more than just laborers who are unhappy at work (disgruntled spouse, disgruntled fans, e.g.), but the word is used in that context very often. If you scan through the usage examples on the right-hand side of the Wordnik page, you'll see that, more often than not, the word is being used to describe someone unhappy with their job.

P.S. You asked for a word or expression – maybe disgruntled clockwatcher could work?

I've heard the term clock-watcher used to describe people who keep one eye on the clock each day, eagerly awaiting quitting time (which can never arrive too soon). Collins says:

clock-watcher: an employee who checks the time in anticipation of a break or of the end of the working day.

It's not a precise fit, because not all clock watchers are disinterested in their job and unhappy with management. But many such disgruntled employees cope by becoming clock-watchers.

So, maybe disgruntled is a better fit? Obviously, disgruntled can be applied to more than just laborers who are unhappy at work (disgruntled spouse, disgruntled fans, e.g.), but the word is used in that context very often. If you scan through the usage examples on the right-hand side of the Wordnik page, you'll see that, more often than not, the word is being used to describe someone unhappy with their job.

disgruntle: To make discontented or dissatisfied; to disappoint; to throw into a state of sulky dissatisfaction: usually in the participial adjective disgruntled.

P.S. You asked for a word or expression – maybe disgruntled clockwatcher could work?

1
source | link

I've heard the term clock-watcher used to describe people who keep one eye on the clock each day, eagerly awaiting quitting time (which can never arrive too soon). Collins says:

clock-watcher: an employee who checks the time in anticipation of a break or of the end of the working day.

It's not a precise fit, because not all clock watchers are disinterested in their job and unhappy with management. But many such disgruntled employees cope by becoming clock-watchers.

So, maybe disgruntled is a better fit? Obviously, disgruntled can be applied to more than just laborers who are unhappy at work (disgruntled spouse, disgruntled fans, e.g.), but the word is used in that context very often. If you scan through the usage examples on the right-hand side of the Wordnik page, you'll see that, more often than not, the word is being used to describe someone unhappy with their job.

P.S. You asked for a word or expression – maybe disgruntled clockwatcher could work?