5 Fixed invalid link [5]. Turned all links from http into https.
source | link

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 15881588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 16781678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 17261726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

    Question Protected by MetaEd
4 Changed tags, and reverted the clever title to the previous title which was more descriptive, as this question is very hard to find with a search engine – I've been curious about this for years!
source | link

In 1588old books, you won't believe what happenedwhy is the first word of the next! page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books, why is the first word of the next page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

In 1588, you won't believe what happened next!

In old books, why is the first word of the next page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

In old books, why is the first word of the next page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

    Notice removed Reward existing answer by Hugo
    Bounty Ended with TML's answer chosen by Hugo
3 added 92 characters in body; edited title
source | link

In old books1588, why is the first word of theyou won't believe what happened next page printed at the bottom of this page?!

In old books, why is the first word of the next page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

In old books, why is the first word of the next page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

In 1588, you won't believe what happened next!

In old books, why is the first word of the next page printed at the bottom of this page?

In old books from the 16th to 18th centuries, the first word from the next page is often printed right justified on its own, at the end of the current page. It's not in every book of this period, but those that have them tend to show them on every page. This practice seems to have ended in the late 18th century.

A 1588 example shows a repeated that:

Hanging that

A hanging but from 1678:

second but

And a dangling fairs, from 1726:

dangling fairs

What was the purpose of repeating this word? My initial guess is it was to help the book binder assemble the book in the correct order, but it happens even with books with page numbers.

When did this practice begin and end, and why did it end?

    Tweeted twitter.com/StackEnglish/status/811257413877776384
    Notice added Reward existing answer by Hugo
    Bounty Started worth 500 reputation by Hugo
2 edited tags
| link
    Post Migrated Here from literature.stackexchange.com
1
source | link