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What rules determine the punctuation ofapostrophe placement in "ham 'n eggs" and similar expressions?

In expressions such as "ham 'n eggs", the conjunction 'n'n appears to replace andand, yet there is only one apostrophe to indicate the missing aa and none for the missing dd (ei.ge., no "ham 'n' eggs").

Is there a punctuation rule that governs this or is it just an idiosyncratic case?

What rules determine the punctuation of "ham 'n eggs"?

In expressions such as "ham 'n eggs" the conjunction 'n appears to replace and, yet there is only one apostrophe to indicate the missing a and none for the missing d (e.g., "ham 'n' eggs").

Is there a punctuation rule that governs this or is it just an idiosyncratic case?

What rules determine the apostrophe placement in "ham 'n eggs" and similar expressions?

In expressions such as "ham 'n eggs", the conjunction 'n appears to replace and, yet there is only one apostrophe to indicate the missing a and none for the missing d (i.e., no "ham 'n' eggs").

Is there a punctuation rule that governs this or is it just an idiosyncratic case?

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What rules determine the punctuation of "ham 'n eggs"?

In expressions such as "ham 'n eggs" the conjunction 'n appears to replace and, yet there is only one apostrophe to indicate the missing a and none for the missing d (e.g., "ham 'n' eggs").

Is there a punctuation rule that governs this or is it just an idiosyncratic case?