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Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

Calling a purse or a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

                                               Harry O Gliffics

Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

Calling a purse or a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

                                               Harry O Gliffics

Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

Calling a purse or a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

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Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

CallimgCalling a purse or a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

                                               Harry O Gliffics

Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

Callimg a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

                                               Harry O Gliffics

Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

Calling a purse or a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

                                               Harry O Gliffics
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source | link

Americans are the most notorious corruptors of the English language. Perhaps we did this early on just to be part of our defiance to the Crown. We say things and refer to things in an "Americanized" way with usually no thought whatsoever to etymology or respect for traditional English usage, or even seem to care why we call things what we do.

Callimg a handbag a "pocketbook" is an example of this. The women I posed this query to laughed, thought it was a good joke, and then they accused me of being a stupid and simple-minded man. If I were to present them with research and facts tomorrow, it would become an even greater opportunity for laughter.

It makes sense in a nonsensical way. Since "pocketbook" was already in usage and was something people were familiar with, then why take the risk of making-up another term to more correctly identify what you were talking about? Call it a pocketbook and people have an idea of what you're talking about without having to go through the trouble and time of making an explanation to those who would accuse you of being vague or ridiculous.

                                               Harry O Gliffics