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A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an attributive adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hour(s)hours train...".

A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an attributive adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hour(s) train...".

A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an attributive adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hours train...".

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A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an adverbialattributive adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hour(s) train...".

A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an adverbial adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hour(s) train...".

A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an attributive adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hour(s) train...".

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A) Official/military/government: 'Thirteen hundred'/'thirteen hundred hours'; 'O one-hundred/O one-hundred hours'. Colloquial/conversational/business: 'One o'clock'/'One p.m.'/'One o'clock p.m.'.

B) 'The trains leave on the hour, at five after, at 15 after, at half past, at fifteen 'til, at 55 after, etc.' Could also be, 'The train leaves every other hour on the one and on the seven,' meaning "At five past" and "at thirty-five past".

C) What you have is fine. "The train departing at _____ is/'will be' delayed for _____. It will now be departing from _____." (e.g., "The train departing at 1300 hours is delayed for 15 minutes. It will now be departing from 1315 hours." -or- "The train 1300 train is delayed for 15 minutes. It will be departing at 1315 hours."

When people use good grammar, they don't usually end their sentences with numbers. This is because when you speak scientifically, you should include units. "Hours" are units of time. People say 1300 hours, meaning 1:00 p.m.

Time can act as an adjective in this case. The 1300 train is the same as the train leaving at 1300 hours. Because this is an adverbial adjective, if you want to use units you have to include a hyphen: "The 1300-hour(s) train...".