2 Clarified last two sentences.
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What is the onomatopoeia for when you remove a sticker or an adhesive from its place? I'm not a native English speaker.

First a clear definition:

Function of Onomatopoeia

Generally, words are used to tell what is happening. Onomatopoeia, on the other hand, helps readers to hear the sounds of the words they reflect. Hence, the reader cannot help but enter the world created by the poet with the aid of these words. The beauty of onomatopoeic words lies in the fact that they are bound to have an effect on the readers’ senses, whether that effect is understood or not. Moreover, a simple plain expression does not have the same emphatic effect that conveys an idea powerfully to the readers. The use of onomatopoeic words helps create emphasis.

Onomatopoeia, in its more complicated use, takes the form of phanopoeia. Phanopoeia is a form of onomatopoeia that describes the sense of things, rather than their natural sounds.

There are different degrees of "stickiness", and so there are different onomatopoeias:

    Example Object     Stickiness     Onomatopoeia

  1. Post-it Sticky Notes - easily removable - peel

  2. Adhesive Tape - moderately sticky - strip

  3. Velcro - fastened together - rip

Note: An onomatopoeia works with the subject and context. Using those three example words with a different subject and context renders the onomatopoeic property inert.

For example: Peeling off your clothes, stripping paint, or a rip tide do not create an onomatopoeic effect. Neither does peeling out, stripping medals, or ripping wood.

Spanish: El sonido exacto para cuando despegas o quitas un sticker o un adhesivo.

English: The exact sound for when you take off or remove a sticker or an adhesive.

English pronunciation of peel.

English pronunciation of, strip.

English pronunciation of and rip (audio).

The word "peel" loses the effect when peel loses the effect in translationtranslated, but the word "strip" (in Spanish, when referring to undressing) is "desnudarse" and "rip" translates to "destruir" (destroyer); which describes the sense of things, in English.

What is the onomatopoeia for when you remove a sticker or an adhesive from its place? I'm not a native English speaker.

First a clear definition:

Function of Onomatopoeia

Generally, words are used to tell what is happening. Onomatopoeia, on the other hand, helps readers to hear the sounds of the words they reflect. Hence, the reader cannot help but enter the world created by the poet with the aid of these words. The beauty of onomatopoeic words lies in the fact that they are bound to have an effect on the readers’ senses, whether that effect is understood or not. Moreover, a simple plain expression does not have the same emphatic effect that conveys an idea powerfully to the readers. The use of onomatopoeic words helps create emphasis.

Onomatopoeia, in its more complicated use, takes the form of phanopoeia. Phanopoeia is a form of onomatopoeia that describes the sense of things, rather than their natural sounds.

There are different degrees of "stickiness", and so there are different onomatopoeias:

    Example Object     Stickiness     Onomatopoeia

  1. Post-it Sticky Notes - easily removable - peel

  2. Adhesive Tape - moderately sticky - strip

  3. Velcro - fastened together - rip

Note: An onomatopoeia works with the subject and context. Using those three example words with a different subject and context renders the onomatopoeic property inert.

For example: Peeling off your clothes, stripping paint, or a rip tide do not create an onomatopoeic effect. Neither does peeling out, stripping medals, or ripping wood.

Spanish: El sonido exacto para cuando despegas o quitas un sticker o un adhesivo.

English: The exact sound for when you take off or remove a sticker or an adhesive.

English pronunciation of peel.

English pronunciation of strip.

English pronunciation of rip.

The word peel loses the effect in translation.

What is the onomatopoeia for when you remove a sticker or an adhesive from its place? I'm not a native English speaker.

First a clear definition:

Function of Onomatopoeia

Generally, words are used to tell what is happening. Onomatopoeia, on the other hand, helps readers to hear the sounds of the words they reflect. Hence, the reader cannot help but enter the world created by the poet with the aid of these words. The beauty of onomatopoeic words lies in the fact that they are bound to have an effect on the readers’ senses, whether that effect is understood or not. Moreover, a simple plain expression does not have the same emphatic effect that conveys an idea powerfully to the readers. The use of onomatopoeic words helps create emphasis.

Onomatopoeia, in its more complicated use, takes the form of phanopoeia. Phanopoeia is a form of onomatopoeia that describes the sense of things, rather than their natural sounds.

There are different degrees of "stickiness", and so there are different onomatopoeias:

    Example Object     Stickiness     Onomatopoeia

  1. Post-it Sticky Notes - easily removable - peel

  2. Adhesive Tape - moderately sticky - strip

  3. Velcro - fastened together - rip

Note: An onomatopoeia works with the subject and context. Using those three example words with a different subject and context renders the onomatopoeic property inert.

For example: Peeling off your clothes, stripping paint, or a rip tide do not create an onomatopoeic effect. Neither does peeling out, stripping medals, or ripping wood.

Spanish: El sonido exacto para cuando despegas o quitas un sticker o un adhesivo.

English: The exact sound for when you take off or remove a sticker or an adhesive.

English pronunciation of peel, strip and rip (audio).

The word "peel" loses the effect when translated, but the word "strip" (in Spanish, when referring to undressing) is "desnudarse" and "rip" translates to "destruir" (destroyer); which describes the sense of things, in English.

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source | link

What is the onomatopoeia for when you remove a sticker or an adhesive from its place? I'm not a native English speaker.

First a clear definition:

Function of Onomatopoeia

Generally, words are used to tell what is happening. Onomatopoeia, on the other hand, helps readers to hear the sounds of the words they reflect. Hence, the reader cannot help but enter the world created by the poet with the aid of these words. The beauty of onomatopoeic words lies in the fact that they are bound to have an effect on the readers’ senses, whether that effect is understood or not. Moreover, a simple plain expression does not have the same emphatic effect that conveys an idea powerfully to the readers. The use of onomatopoeic words helps create emphasis.

Onomatopoeia, in its more complicated use, takes the form of phanopoeia. Phanopoeia is a form of onomatopoeia that describes the sense of things, rather than their natural sounds.

There are different degrees of "stickiness", and so there are different onomatopoeias:

    Example Object     Stickiness     Onomatopoeia

  1. Post-it Sticky Notes - easily removable - peel

  2. Adhesive Tape - moderately sticky - strip

  3. Velcro - fastened together - rip

Note: An onomatopoeia works with the subject and context. Using those three example words with a different subject and context renders the onomatopoeic property inert.

For example: Peeling off your clothes, stripping paint, or a rip tide do not create an onomatopoeic effect. Neither does peeling out, stripping medals, or ripping wood.

Spanish: El sonido exacto para cuando despegas o quitas un sticker o un adhesivo.

English: The exact sound for when you take off or remove a sticker or an adhesive.

English pronunciation of peel.

English pronunciation of strip.

English pronunciation of rip.

The word peel loses the effect in translation.