3 "hair" and "hare" are homophones
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Edit: The writer is making a pun on the homonymshomophones "hair" and "hare." (I'm imagining that the reader is seeing a picture of animals that look like rabbits. But these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. The reader's perception was off "by a hair.")


I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

Edit: The writer is making a pun on the homonyms "hair" and "hare." (I'm imagining that the reader is seeing a picture of animals that look like rabbits. But these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. The reader's perception was off "by a hair.")


I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

Edit: The writer is making a pun on the homophones "hair" and "hare." (I'm imagining that the reader is seeing a picture of animals that look like rabbits. But these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. The reader's perception was off "by a hair.")


I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

2 added the possibility of a pun
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Edit: The writer is making a pun on the homonyms "hair" and "hare." (I'm imagining that the reader is seeing a picture of animals that look like rabbits. But these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. The reader's perception was off "by a hair.")


I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

Edit: The writer is making a pun on the homonyms "hair" and "hare." (I'm imagining that the reader is seeing a picture of animals that look like rabbits. But these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. The reader's perception was off "by a hair.")


I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

1
source | link

I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.