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3 added 4 characters in body
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I would use patronizingpatronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situationsituations 1 & 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situations 1 & 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.

I would use patronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situation 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situations 1 & 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.

I would use patronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situations 1 & 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situations 1 & 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.

2 added 5 characters in body
source | link

I would use patronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situation 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situationsituations 1 & 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.

I would use patronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situation 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situation 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.

I would use patronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situation 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situations 1 & 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.

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source | link

I would use patronizing to describe someone who has the attitude that,

I know what's best for you, even if I don't know you well or just met you (situations 1 & 2), even if I don't know the context or details or background (situation 2), and even if you have explicitly voiced your disagreement with my opinion or valid objections to my plan of action (situation 3).

Patronizing can also describe a specific action that a person took at a specific time, rather than the overall demeanor of the person.

It does have somewhat broader meaning than the situations you described.

patronizing (British patronising)

adjective

Apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending.

When applied to someone who enjoys respect or status due to education, training, or experience, it can mean that the person took the liberty of making a decision or acted with disregard to your circumstance or wishes.

The patronizing doctor assumed that I would want pharmaceutical pain relievers without presenting any alternative options.

When applied to random strangers who don't presume any special expertise, it can also mean, simply, insincere or judgemental.

The shopkeeper greeted me in a patronizing manner.