3 added 220 characters in body
source | link

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

Etymology from French enchâsser - to set (precious stone). The root isIt appears unconnected with chase meaning "to hunt etc", which is from the old French chacier later chascier by 11th century chaser. (OED) However a Northern French variant is written cacher, which is of course modern French for "to hide".  One suspects there may be a connected root here. As we have noted before we are not authoritative on French etymologies.

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

Etymology from French enchâsser - to set (precious stone). The root is unconnected with chase meaning "to hunt etc", which is from the old French chacier later chascier by 11th century chaser. (OED).  

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

Etymology from French enchâsser - to set (precious stone). It appears unconnected with chase meaning "to hunt etc", which is from the old French chacier later chascier by 11th century chaser. (OED) However a Northern French variant is written cacher, which is of course modern French for "to hide". One suspects there may be a connected root here. As we have noted before we are not authoritative on French etymologies.

2 added 220 characters in body
source | link

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

Etymology from French enchâsser - to set (precious stone). The root is unconnected with chase meaning "to hunt etc", which is from the old French chacier later chascier by 11th century chaser. (OED).

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

Etymology from French enchâsser - to set (precious stone). The root is unconnected with chase meaning "to hunt etc", which is from the old French chacier later chascier by 11th century chaser. (OED).

1
source | link

It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster