3 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is generally singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.

Note, however, as recorded in another EL&U questionanother EL&U question, that the pluralization depends on which two entities are being compared. In this case you are comparing one website with another website, so the singular is clearly called for; but if you were comparing one group of things with another group, the plural could be used:

Neither the Smiths nor the Wessons are available for dinner.

Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is generally singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.

Note, however, as recorded in another EL&U question, that the pluralization depends on which two entities are being compared. In this case you are comparing one website with another website, so the singular is clearly called for; but if you were comparing one group of things with another group, the plural could be used:

Neither the Smiths nor the Wessons are available for dinner.

Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is generally singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.

Note, however, as recorded in another EL&U question, that the pluralization depends on which two entities are being compared. In this case you are comparing one website with another website, so the singular is clearly called for; but if you were comparing one group of things with another group, the plural could be used:

Neither the Smiths nor the Wessons are available for dinner.

2 add link to another question, incorporate some additional explanation from it
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Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is generally singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.

Note, however, as recorded in another EL&U question, that the pluralization depends on which two entities are being compared. In this case you are comparing one website with another website, so the singular is clearly called for; but if you were comparing one group of things with another group, the plural could be used:

Neither the Smiths nor the Wessons are available for dinner.

Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.

Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is generally singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.

Note, however, as recorded in another EL&U question, that the pluralization depends on which two entities are being compared. In this case you are comparing one website with another website, so the singular is clearly called for; but if you were comparing one group of things with another group, the plural could be used:

Neither the Smiths nor the Wessons are available for dinner.

1
source | link

Neither is the subject (it is being used as a pronoun). It is singular, as evidenced in the sample usage at dictionary.com. So you should go with

No, neither of these websites is biased, as they both give a wide range of good information without being one-sided.