The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
    Post Closed as "duplicate" by Peter Shor , AmE speaker, Hellion, jimm101, Rory Alsop of
2 Added an update
source | link

If I have a split verb, such as "pick up" and I am a addressing a third person, I can say either:

I will pick Fred up at 11am.

Or:

I will pick up Fred at 11am.

For the second person, we have:

I will pick you up at 11am.

But it sounds wrong if I say:

I will pick up you at 11am.

What is my missing understanding here?


UPDATE:

My understanding from reading the possible duplicate question and the given answers, is that there is no strict rule about this at all, only a matter of style.

Thinking about it, I realised there is nothing wrong with the fourth example above, for example, if you wanted to give emphasis. Imagine saying the sentence and pointing your finger at the intended person:

I will pick up you at 11am.

It is no longer an awkward sentence, but becomes a highly emphatic one.

If I have a split verb, such as "pick up" and I am a addressing a third person, I can say either:

I will pick Fred up at 11am.

Or:

I will pick up Fred at 11am.

For the second person, we have:

I will pick you up at 11am.

But it sounds wrong if I say:

I will pick up you at 11am.

What is my missing understanding here?

If I have a split verb, such as "pick up" and I am a addressing a third person, I can say either:

I will pick Fred up at 11am.

Or:

I will pick up Fred at 11am.

For the second person, we have:

I will pick you up at 11am.

But it sounds wrong if I say:

I will pick up you at 11am.

What is my missing understanding here?


UPDATE:

My understanding from reading the possible duplicate question and the given answers, is that there is no strict rule about this at all, only a matter of style.

Thinking about it, I realised there is nothing wrong with the fourth example above, for example, if you wanted to give emphasis. Imagine saying the sentence and pointing your finger at the intended person:

I will pick up you at 11am.

It is no longer an awkward sentence, but becomes a highly emphatic one.

1
source | link

Word order for a split verb

If I have a split verb, such as "pick up" and I am a addressing a third person, I can say either:

I will pick Fred up at 11am.

Or:

I will pick up Fred at 11am.

For the second person, we have:

I will pick you up at 11am.

But it sounds wrong if I say:

I will pick up you at 11am.

What is my missing understanding here?