We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
2 added 143 characters in body
source | link

My personal reaction to your list:

  • laryngitis — I think that means a sore throat.
  • laryngoscopy — I've never seen this word, but from "-scopy" impliesI suppose it's a throat examination.
  • pulmonary — I think that's something to do with the heart.
  • pulmonologist — A specialist in "pulmonary", I suppose. But if those two words weren't adjacent in your list I might miss the connection.
  • apnea — Vaguely sounds scary. A hole in the heart?
  • tracheostomy — That might be the dramatic trick where they push a ball-point pen into the throat for emergency breathing, but I'm not confident.

All the others give the strong feeling of being medical terms — I know they are not plants for example — and yet I can't define them at all.

That's despite the fact that I also speak Spanish well, and some French, and I enjoy recognizing the many Latin roots among these languages, and I enjoy reading about word etymologies (I'm just trying to clarify I'm not a moron!); apparently that is not enough for these words.


So "no" is the answer to your question!

Someone without medical training will understand more words on that list if someone in their life has experienced the conditions, or maybe if they watch medical dramas on TV. But I wouldn't be surprised to meet a native English speaker who was confident aboutcould define nothing on your list.

For what it's worth, the spell checker in my Firefox browser recognizes only "rhinitis", "laryngitis", "pulmonary", and "rhinoplasty", and is confused by all the others.

"Laryngitis" is the only one I strongly feel I should know. I've heard it enough times. The others feel like jargon used only by doctors.

I recently read a UK news article about doctors being urged to use "plain English" terms instead, precisely because the medical terms can be so unfamiliar and scary to patients:
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-45394620

That article tells me that "pulmonary" means lung, not heart. I also checked the others and it turns out that "apnea" means "not breathing", and "laryngitis" means a problem with the voice, not precisely "sore throat", from "larynx" meaning voice box. You see? I'm cluelessI haven't a clue.

My personal reaction to your list:

  • laryngitis — I think that means a sore throat.
  • laryngoscopy — I've never seen this word, but "-scopy" implies it's a throat examination.
  • pulmonary — I think that's something to do with the heart.
  • pulmonologist — A specialist in "pulmonary", I suppose. But if those two words weren't adjacent in your list I might miss the connection.
  • apnea — Vaguely sounds scary. A hole in the heart?
  • tracheostomy — That might be the trick where they push a ball-point pen into the throat for emergency breathing, but I'm not confident.

All the others give the strong feeling of being medical terms — I know they are not plants for example — and yet I can't define them at all.

That's despite the fact that I also speak Spanish well, and some French, and I enjoy recognizing the many Latin roots among these languages, and I enjoy reading about word etymologies (I'm just trying to clarify I'm not a moron!); apparently that is not enough for these words.


So "no" is the answer to your question!

Someone without medical training will understand more words on that list if someone in their life has experienced the conditions, or maybe if they watch medical dramas on TV. But I wouldn't be surprised to meet a native English speaker who was confident about nothing on your list.

For what it's worth, the spell checker in my Firefox browser recognizes only "rhinitis", "laryngitis", "pulmonary", and "rhinoplasty", and is confused by all the others.

"Laryngitis" is the only one I strongly feel I should know. The others feel like jargon used only by doctors.

I recently read a UK news article about doctors being urged to use "plain English" terms instead, precisely because the medical terms can be so unfamiliar and scary to patients:
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-45394620

That article tells me that "pulmonary" means lung, not heart. I also checked the others and it turns out that "apnea" means "not breathing". You see? I'm clueless.

My personal reaction to your list:

  • laryngitis — I think that means a sore throat.
  • laryngoscopy — I've never seen this word, but from "-scopy" I suppose it's a throat examination.
  • pulmonary — I think that's something to do with the heart.
  • pulmonologist — A specialist in "pulmonary", I suppose. But if those two words weren't adjacent in your list I might miss the connection.
  • apnea — Vaguely sounds scary. A hole in the heart?
  • tracheostomy — That might be the dramatic trick where they push a ball-point pen into the throat for emergency breathing, but I'm not confident.

All the others give the strong feeling of being medical terms — I know they are not plants for example — and yet I can't define them at all.

That's despite the fact that I also speak Spanish well, and some French, and I enjoy recognizing the many Latin roots among these languages, and I enjoy reading about word etymologies (I'm just trying to clarify I'm not a moron!); apparently that is not enough for these words.


So "no" is the answer to your question!

Someone without medical training will understand more words on that list if someone in their life has experienced the conditions, or maybe if they watch medical dramas on TV. But I wouldn't be surprised to meet a native English speaker who could define nothing on your list.

For what it's worth, the spell checker in my Firefox browser recognizes only "rhinitis", "laryngitis", "pulmonary", and "rhinoplasty", and is confused by all the others.

"Laryngitis" is the only one I feel I should know. I've heard it enough times. The others feel like jargon used only by doctors.

I recently read a UK news article about doctors being urged to use "plain English" terms instead, precisely because the medical terms can be so unfamiliar and scary to patients:
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-45394620

That article tells me that "pulmonary" means lung, not heart. I also checked the others and it turns out that "apnea" means "not breathing", and "laryngitis" means a problem with the voice, not precisely "sore throat", from "larynx" meaning voice box. You see? I haven't a clue.

1
source | link

My personal reaction to your list:

  • laryngitis — I think that means a sore throat.
  • laryngoscopy — I've never seen this word, but "-scopy" implies it's a throat examination.
  • pulmonary — I think that's something to do with the heart.
  • pulmonologist — A specialist in "pulmonary", I suppose. But if those two words weren't adjacent in your list I might miss the connection.
  • apnea — Vaguely sounds scary. A hole in the heart?
  • tracheostomy — That might be the trick where they push a ball-point pen into the throat for emergency breathing, but I'm not confident.

All the others give the strong feeling of being medical terms — I know they are not plants for example — and yet I can't define them at all.

That's despite the fact that I also speak Spanish well, and some French, and I enjoy recognizing the many Latin roots among these languages, and I enjoy reading about word etymologies (I'm just trying to clarify I'm not a moron!); apparently that is not enough for these words.


So "no" is the answer to your question!

Someone without medical training will understand more words on that list if someone in their life has experienced the conditions, or maybe if they watch medical dramas on TV. But I wouldn't be surprised to meet a native English speaker who was confident about nothing on your list.

For what it's worth, the spell checker in my Firefox browser recognizes only "rhinitis", "laryngitis", "pulmonary", and "rhinoplasty", and is confused by all the others.

"Laryngitis" is the only one I strongly feel I should know. The others feel like jargon used only by doctors.

I recently read a UK news article about doctors being urged to use "plain English" terms instead, precisely because the medical terms can be so unfamiliar and scary to patients:
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-45394620

That article tells me that "pulmonary" means lung, not heart. I also checked the others and it turns out that "apnea" means "not breathing". You see? I'm clueless.