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The name of a city is a proper noun that describes a single entity, so the verb is singular in English.

If the name of a city were Wonderful Sights, then you would say that Wonderful Sights is a city.

It doesn't matter if a particular word in the proper noun is plural, it only matters that the thing being described is singular.


Of course, such naming could lead to confusion:

"Did you see Wonderful SightsWonderful Sights on your trip?"
"No, everything was pretty mundane."
"So, you didn't visit it?"
"Didn't visit what? You were asking about the sights."
"What do you mean? I was asking about the city."

But, Abbot and Costello–type skits aside, the grammar in this case follows the thing that is named, not the name itself.

The name of a city is a proper noun that describes a single entity, so the verb is singular in English.

If the name of a city were Wonderful Sights, then you would say that Wonderful Sights is a city.

It doesn't matter if a particular word in the proper noun is plural, it only matters that the thing being described is singular.


Of course, such naming could lead to confusion:

"Did you see Wonderful Sights on your trip?"
"No, everything was pretty mundane."
"So, you didn't visit it?"
"Didn't visit what? You were asking about the sights."
"What do you mean? I was asking about the city."

But, Abbot and Costello–type skits aside, the grammar follows the thing that is named, not the name itself.

The name of a city is a proper noun that describes a single entity, so the verb is singular in English.

If the name of a city were Wonderful Sights, then you would say that Wonderful Sights is a city.

It doesn't matter if a particular word in the proper noun is plural, it only matters that the thing being described is singular.


Of course, such naming could lead to confusion:

"Did you see Wonderful Sights on your trip?"
"No, everything was pretty mundane."
"So, you didn't visit it?"
"Didn't visit what? You were asking about the sights."
"What do you mean? I was asking about the city."

But, Abbot and Costello–type skits aside, the grammar in this case follows the thing that is named, not the name itself.

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source | link

The name of a city is a proper noun that describes a single entity, so the verb is singular in English.

If the name of a city were Wonderful Sights, then you would say that Wonderful Sights is a city.

It doesn't matter if a particular word in the proper noun is plural, it only matters that the thing being described is singular.


Of course, such naming could lead to confusion:

"Did you see Wonderful Sights on your trip?"
"No, everything was pretty mundane."
"So, you didn't visit it?"
"Didn't visit what? You were asking about the sights."
"What do you mean? I was asking about the city."

But, Abbot and Costello–type skits aside, the grammar follows the thing that is named, not the name itself.