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What punctuation is used for glossary entries is completely a matter of style.

Although The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) was referenced in different answers, its specific discussion of glossary entries was not.

From Chicago, 1.61 (emphasis mine):

A glossary is a useful tool in a book containing many words in another language or other unfamiliar terms. Words to be defined should be arranged in alphabetical order, each on a separate line and followed by its definition. (The term may be followed by a period, a colon, or an em dash, or distinguished from the definition typographically, or both.) A glossary usually precedes the notes and bibliography or reference list but may follow the notes, especially if terms listed in the glossary appear in the notes. A glossary that consists mainly of terms that do not appear in the text may be included as an appendix.

Also, in 2.23 (emphasis mine again):

Each entry in a glossary or list of abbreviations should begin on a new line, capitalized only if the term is capitalized in the text. Separate each term from the definition that follows with a period, a colon, or an em dash (choose one and use it consistently . . .). In a glossary, begin the definition with a capital letter, as if it were a new sentence; in a list of abbreviations, the expanded term should be capitalized or lowercased as it would be in text.

Chicago mentions only periods, colons, and em dashes. (And, in one section, the use of different typography, which I assume refers to such things as font face, emphasis, size, colour, and so on.)

Other style guides, as well as specific house style guideguides, may provide different guidance.

What punctuation is used for glossary entries is completely a matter of style.

Although The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) was referenced in different answers, its specific discussion of glossary entries was not.

From Chicago, 1.61 (emphasis mine):

A glossary is a useful tool in a book containing many words in another language or other unfamiliar terms. Words to be defined should be arranged in alphabetical order, each on a separate line and followed by its definition. (The term may be followed by a period, a colon, or an em dash, or distinguished from the definition typographically, or both.) A glossary usually precedes the notes and bibliography or reference list but may follow the notes, especially if terms listed in the glossary appear in the notes. A glossary that consists mainly of terms that do not appear in the text may be included as an appendix.

Also, in 2.23 (emphasis mine again):

Each entry in a glossary or list of abbreviations should begin on a new line, capitalized only if the term is capitalized in the text. Separate each term from the definition that follows with a period, a colon, or an em dash (choose one and use it consistently . . .). In a glossary, begin the definition with a capital letter, as if it were a new sentence; in a list of abbreviations, the expanded term should be capitalized or lowercased as it would be in text.

Chicago mentions only periods, colons, and em dashes. (And, in one section, the use of different typography, which I assume refers to such things as font face, emphasis, size, colour, and so on.)

Other style guides, as well as specific house style guide, may provide different guidance.

What punctuation is used for glossary entries is completely a matter of style.

Although The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) was referenced in different answers, its specific discussion of glossary entries was not.

From Chicago, 1.61 (emphasis mine):

A glossary is a useful tool in a book containing many words in another language or other unfamiliar terms. Words to be defined should be arranged in alphabetical order, each on a separate line and followed by its definition. (The term may be followed by a period, a colon, or an em dash, or distinguished from the definition typographically, or both.) A glossary usually precedes the notes and bibliography or reference list but may follow the notes, especially if terms listed in the glossary appear in the notes. A glossary that consists mainly of terms that do not appear in the text may be included as an appendix.

Also, in 2.23 (emphasis mine again):

Each entry in a glossary or list of abbreviations should begin on a new line, capitalized only if the term is capitalized in the text. Separate each term from the definition that follows with a period, a colon, or an em dash (choose one and use it consistently . . .). In a glossary, begin the definition with a capital letter, as if it were a new sentence; in a list of abbreviations, the expanded term should be capitalized or lowercased as it would be in text.

Chicago mentions only periods, colons, and em dashes. (And, in one section, the use of different typography, which I assume refers to such things as font face, emphasis, size, colour, and so on.)

Other style guides, as well as specific house style guides, may provide different guidance.

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source | link

What punctuation is used for glossary entries is completely a matter of style.

Although The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) was referenced in different answers, its specific discussion of glossary entries was not.

From Chicago, 1.61 (emphasis mine):

A glossary is a useful tool in a book containing many words in another language or other unfamiliar terms. Words to be defined should be arranged in alphabetical order, each on a separate line and followed by its definition. (The term may be followed by a period, a colon, or an em dash, or distinguished from the definition typographically, or both.) A glossary usually precedes the notes and bibliography or reference list but may follow the notes, especially if terms listed in the glossary appear in the notes. A glossary that consists mainly of terms that do not appear in the text may be included as an appendix.

Also, in 2.23 (emphasis mine again):

Each entry in a glossary or list of abbreviations should begin on a new line, capitalized only if the term is capitalized in the text. Separate each term from the definition that follows with a period, a colon, or an em dash (choose one and use it consistently . . .). In a glossary, begin the definition with a capital letter, as if it were a new sentence; in a list of abbreviations, the expanded term should be capitalized or lowercased as it would be in text.

Chicago mentions only periods, colons, and em dashes. (And, in one section, the use of different typography, which I assume refers to such things as font face, emphasis, size, colour, and so on.)

Other style guides, as well as specific house style guide, may provide different guidance.