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Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this original is ambiguous.

While I would guess that more people would assumedo think the most logical assumption is that ifthe first cannot know something the second does not told by contextknow about themselves, and that a person would havein the unusual knowledge about anothercase that they do not possess, it still could be a doctor informing a patient of their diagnosis, or sharing thatthe context would have let us know they also hadwere a similar diagnosis inmedical professional, even many people do not assume the past etcmost common by default.

Another good answer used "former and latter" . This is definitely a proper approach, however, I believe those words can baffle too many people and can also sound a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand "former" and "latter" ... as simple as they should be, people get flustered with them like adding fractions is tough for others.

I do not think the following are better, however I do think they are other alternatives to add to the list of other answers:helpful possibilities.

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of thoseThese use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

Again, this is a tricky question and many situations with more parties get even harder. The more approaches the better.

Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this original is ambiguous.

While I would guess that more people would assume that if not told by context that a person would have unusual knowledge about another that they do not possess, it still could be a doctor informing a patient of their diagnosis, or sharing that they also had a similar diagnosis in the past etc.

Another good answer used "former and latter" . This is definitely a proper approach, however, I believe those words can baffle too many people and can also sound a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand "former" and "latter" ... as simple as they should be, people get flustered with them like adding fractions is tough for others.

I do not think the following are better, however I do think they are other alternatives to add to the list of other answers:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

Again, this is a tricky question and many situations with more parties get even harder. The more approaches the better.

Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this original is ambiguous.

While I do think the most logical assumption is that the first cannot know something the second does not know about themselves, and that in the unusual case that they do, the context would have let us know they were a medical professional, even many people do not assume the most common by default.

Another good answer used "former and latter" . This is definitely a proper approach, however, I believe those words can baffle too many people and can also sound a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand "former" and "latter" ... as simple as they should be, people get flustered with them like adding fractions is tough for others.

I do not think the following are better, however I do think they are helpful possibilities.

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

These use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

Again, this is a tricky question and many situations with more parties get even harder. The more approaches the better.

6 added 107 characters in body
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Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this Isoriginal is ambiguous. Even if without context, most might

While I would guess that itmore people would be unlikelyassume that the first knew somethingif not told by context that a person would have unusual knowledge about the secondanother that they didn't know about themselvesdo not possess, unless they wereit still could be a health professiondoctor informing a patient of their diagnosis, andor sharing that generally we would know if the first werethey also had a health professionalsimilar diagnosis in most paragraphs, that could still be off. (both the doctor and the patient might have cancer?)

I would like to try another alternative, not because it is better but because sometimes "another way" is usefulpast etc.

I am afraid thatAnother good answer used "former and latter" ...as This is definitely a proper as the approach is, however, I believe those words can baffle too many people and iscan also sound a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand it"former" and "latter" ... as simple as they should be, people get flustered with them like adding fractions is tough for others.

Here area coupleI do not think the following are better, however I do think they are other samplesalternatives to add to the list of other answers:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

ItAgain, this is reallya tricky thoughquestion and many situations with more parties - I can't describe most hypothetical situations without ambiguityget even harder. The more approaches the better.

Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this Is ambiguous. Even if without context, most might guess that it would be unlikely that the first knew something about the second that they didn't know about themselves, unless they were a health profession, and that generally we would know if the first were a health professional in most paragraphs, that could still be off. (both the doctor and the patient might have cancer?)

I would like to try another alternative, not because it is better but because sometimes "another way" is useful.

I am afraid that "former and latter" ...as proper as the approach is, can baffle too many people and is also a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand it.

Here area couple other samples:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

It is really tricky though with more parties - I can't describe most hypothetical situations without ambiguity.

Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this original is ambiguous.

While I would guess that more people would assume that if not told by context that a person would have unusual knowledge about another that they do not possess, it still could be a doctor informing a patient of their diagnosis, or sharing that they also had a similar diagnosis in the past etc.

Another good answer used "former and latter" . This is definitely a proper approach, however, I believe those words can baffle too many people and can also sound a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand "former" and "latter" ... as simple as they should be, people get flustered with them like adding fractions is tough for others.

I do not think the following are better, however I do think they are other alternatives to add to the list of other answers:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

Again, this is a tricky question and many situations with more parties get even harder. The more approaches the better.

5 added 130 characters in body
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Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this Is ambiguous. Even if without context, most might guess that it would be unlikely that the first knew something about the second that they didn't know about themselves, unless they were a health profession, and that generally we would know if the first were a health professional in most paragraphs, that could still be off. (both the doctor and the patient might have cancer?)

I would like to try another alternative, not because it is better but because sometimes "another way" is useful.

I am afraid that "former and latter" ...as proper as the approach is, can baffle too many people and is also a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand it.

Here area couple other samples:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica so.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her so.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

It is really tricky though with more parties - I can't describe most hypothetical situations without ambiguity.

Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this Is ambiguous. Even if without context, most might guess that it would be unlikely that the first knew something about the second that they didn't know about themselves, unless they were a health profession, and that generally we would know if the first were a health professional in most paragraphs, that could still be off. (both the doctor and the patient might have cancer?)

I would like to try another alternative, not because it is better but because sometimes "another way" is useful.

I am afraid that "former and latter" ...as proper as the approach is, can baffle too many people and is also a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand it.

Here area couple other samples:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica so.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her so.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

It is really tricky though with more parties - I can't describe most hypothetical situations without ambiguity.

Lindsey told Jessica that she had cancer.

As others have said, this Is ambiguous. Even if without context, most might guess that it would be unlikely that the first knew something about the second that they didn't know about themselves, unless they were a health profession, and that generally we would know if the first were a health professional in most paragraphs, that could still be off. (both the doctor and the patient might have cancer?)

I would like to try another alternative, not because it is better but because sometimes "another way" is useful.

I am afraid that "former and latter" ...as proper as the approach is, can baffle too many people and is also a bit formal. I'm not sure a 4th grader would understand it.

Here area couple other samples:

Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica.

or Lindsey has cancer and told Jessica the sad news.

Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and told her.

or Lindsey learned that Jessica had cancer and broke that news to her.

Both of those use two verbs that both related to the first named person.

It is really tricky though with more parties - I can't describe most hypothetical situations without ambiguity.

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3 rollback - no.
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