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In the olden days, markets were set up in cleared areas where trees had been cut down and a tree stump could be used as a rudimentary seat or table. This phrase derives from horse trading or other dealing where money was put onto a wooden post (stump) to display good faith in a cash deal. It is a variant of the expression 'cash on the nail'. The Reverend William Carr published a glossary of the colloquial language of the Craven district of West Yorkshire in 1828, titled The Dialect of Craven, in which he defined 'stump' as a verb:

This phrase derives from horse trading or other dealing where money was put onto a wooden post (stump) to display good faith in a cash deal. It is a variant of the expression 'cash on the nail'.

The Reverend William Carr published a glossary of the colloquial language of the Craven district of West Yorkshire in 1828, titled The Dialect of Craven, in which he defined 'stump' as a verb:

"Stump, to pay ready money,... to pay down on the nail."

"Stump, to pay ready money,... to pay down on the nail."From The Phrase Finder

In the olden days, markets were set up in cleared areas where trees had been cut down and a tree stump could be used as a rudimentary seat or table. This phrase derives from horse trading or other dealing where money was put onto a wooden post (stump) to display good faith in a cash deal. It is a variant of the expression 'cash on the nail'. The Reverend William Carr published a glossary of the colloquial language of the Craven district of West Yorkshire in 1828, titled The Dialect of Craven, in which he defined 'stump' as a verb:

"Stump, to pay ready money,... to pay down on the nail."

In the olden days, markets were set up in cleared areas where trees had been cut down and a tree stump could be used as a rudimentary seat or table.

This phrase derives from horse trading or other dealing where money was put onto a wooden post (stump) to display good faith in a cash deal. It is a variant of the expression 'cash on the nail'.

The Reverend William Carr published a glossary of the colloquial language of the Craven district of West Yorkshire in 1828, titled The Dialect of Craven, in which he defined 'stump' as a verb:

"Stump, to pay ready money,... to pay down on the nail."

From The Phrase Finder

1
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In the olden days, markets were set up in cleared areas where trees had been cut down and a tree stump could be used as a rudimentary seat or table. This phrase derives from horse trading or other dealing where money was put onto a wooden post (stump) to display good faith in a cash deal. It is a variant of the expression 'cash on the nail'. The Reverend William Carr published a glossary of the colloquial language of the Craven district of West Yorkshire in 1828, titled The Dialect of Craven, in which he defined 'stump' as a verb:

"Stump, to pay ready money,... to pay down on the nail."