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2 clarified what I meant by “a necessity enforced by something else”
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Here is my take on sentence #2. The word must can mean both your order and a necessity enforced by something else (physics, regulations, conventions, and so on). Therefore, if there is a possibility of confusion of the meaning of must, I think that have to is preferred when you mean a necessity.

But in sentence #2, I do not think that there is a possibilitythe meaning of confusionmust is ambiguous (unless you are in an unlikely situation where the store can be reached with or without crossing the street and you might be telling someone not to go to the store without crossing the street). Therefore I find nothing wrong about sentence #2.

(I am not a native speaker of English.)

Here is my take on sentence #2. The word must can mean both your order and a necessity enforced by something else. Therefore, if there is a possibility of confusion of the meaning of must, I think that have to is preferred when you mean a necessity.

But in sentence #2, I do not think that there is a possibility of confusion (unless you are in an unlikely situation where the store can be reached with or without crossing the street and you might be telling someone not to go to the store without crossing the street). Therefore I find nothing wrong about sentence #2.

(I am not a native speaker of English.)

Here is my take on sentence #2. The word must can mean both your order and a necessity enforced by something else (physics, regulations, conventions, and so on). Therefore, if there is a possibility of confusion of the meaning of must, I think that have to is preferred when you mean a necessity.

But in sentence #2, I do not think that the meaning of must is ambiguous (unless you are in an unlikely situation where the store can be reached with or without crossing the street and you might be telling someone not to go to the store without crossing the street). Therefore I find nothing wrong about sentence #2.

(I am not a native speaker of English.)

1
source | link

Here is my take on sentence #2. The word must can mean both your order and a necessity enforced by something else. Therefore, if there is a possibility of confusion of the meaning of must, I think that have to is preferred when you mean a necessity.

But in sentence #2, I do not think that there is a possibility of confusion (unless you are in an unlikely situation where the store can be reached with or without crossing the street and you might be telling someone not to go to the store without crossing the street). Therefore I find nothing wrong about sentence #2.

(I am not a native speaker of English.)