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According to The Right Word at the Right Time (p311):

It is very difficult to use its other than in front of the noun it refers to; anything else sounds very awkward:

  • ?This can't be our dog's bone, but perhaps that bone there is its.

(A question mark preceding a sentence is the usual convention for denoting the sentence that follows as questionable.)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (p471) in its discussion of the genitive its notes:

This form is largely restricted to the constructions where dependent forms are used.

By dependent forms the CGEL essentially means preceding a noun. That said, the CGEL later lists two examples, only one of which it denotes as ungrammatical (*):

  • The Guardian seems to respect its readers more than the Sun respects its.

  • *The bank is being sued by a rich client of its.

So, the the question Is the necklace its? is indeed awkward (or weird), but probably not ungrammatical. But if someone asks me: Whose bone is that? I shall enjoy pointing to my dog and saying: It's its!

According to The Right Word at the Right Time (p311):

It is very difficult to use its other than in front of the noun it refers to; anything else sounds very awkward:

  • ?This can't be our dog's bone, but perhaps that bone there is its.

(A question mark preceding a sentence is the usual convention for denoting the sentence that follows as questionable.)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (p471) in its discussion of the genitive its notes:

This form is largely restricted to the constructions where dependent forms are used.

By dependent forms the CGEL essentially means preceding a noun. That said, the CGEL later lists two examples, only one of which it denotes as ungrammatical (*):

  • The Guardian seems to respect its readers more than the Sun respects its.

  • *The bank is being sued by a rich client of its.

So, the the question Is the necklace its? is indeed awkward (or weird), but probably not ungrammatical. But if someone asks me: Whose bone is that? I shall enjoy pointing to my dog and saying: It's its!

According to The Right Word at the Right Time (p311):

It is very difficult to use its other than in front of the noun it refers to; anything else sounds very awkward:

  • ?This can't be our dog's bone, but perhaps that bone there is its.

(A question mark preceding a sentence is the usual convention for denoting the sentence that follows as questionable.)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (p471) in its discussion of the genitive its notes:

This form is largely restricted to the constructions where dependent forms are used.

By dependent forms the CGEL essentially means preceding a noun. That said, the CGEL later lists two examples, only one of which it denotes as ungrammatical (*):

  • The Guardian seems to respect its readers more than the Sun respects its.

  • *The bank is being sued by a rich client of its.

So, the question Is the necklace its? is indeed awkward (or weird), but probably not ungrammatical. But if someone asks me: Whose bone is that? I shall enjoy pointing to my dog and saying: It's its!

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source | link

According to The Right Word at the Right Time (p311):

It is very difficult to use its other than in front of the noun it refers to; anything else sounds very awkward:

  • ?This can't be our dog's bone, but perhaps that bone there is its.

(A question mark preceding a sentence is the usual convention for denoting the sentence that follows as questionable.)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (p471) in its discussion of the genitive its notes:

This form is largely restricted to the constructions where dependent forms are used.

By dependent forms the CGEL essentially means preceding a noun. That said, the CGEL later lists two examples, only one of which it denotes as ungrammatical (*):

  • The Guardian seems to respect its readers more than the Sun respects its.

  • *The bank is being sued by a rich client of its.

So, the the question Is the necklace its? is indeed awkward (or weird), but probably not ungrammatical. But if someone asks me: Whose bone is that? I shall enjoy pointing to my dog and saying: It's its!