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4 "hap", fixed grammar and typo
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Smirkmishap

A 21st century candidate, whose meaning can be easily guessed. Like schadenfreude, it is a compound noun composed of "smirk" (both a noun and verb) and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

Merriam-Webster defines "smirk" as

verb
: to smile in an unpleasant way because you are pleased with yourself, glad about someone else's trouble, etc.

What does the OP intend by calque?

AThe word calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

An additional example would be the English term wisdom tooth and the Italian dente del giudizio, both are the calque of the Latin dēns sapientiae. Using the strict criteria set by the OP and its bounty benefactor, the "best etymological calque" of sapientia would not be wisdom, derived from Old High German wistuom, but instead sapience. Moreover, the Italian word giudizio (judgement) is not a cognate of sapentia but of Latin iudicium.

There is no rule, anywhere, that a calque must be formed by cognates. It's simply untrue, and the OP's quest is senseless and flawed. A much more realistic approach, from a linguistic point of view, would be to translate the loanword using common English words whose meaning are naturally intuitive. Therefore, I suggest that to smirk at someone's mishap, translates the meaning of schadenfrudeschadenfreude, rather neatly. It just so happens that "smirk" has Old English origins and is possibly derived from Proto-Germanic smarōną, while the Germanic-sounding mishap is a compound word that incorporates the prefix mis- with the virtually obsolete and archaic hap, meaning "luck", "fortune". Hap dates back to Proto-Germanic *hap- (an unfortunate episode or accidentsource of Old English gehæp "convenient, fit") sounds Germanic but whose etymology, it is uncertainno longer used in the English language but its derivatives, hapless and mishap, have survived to the present-day.

Smirkmishap

A 21st century candidate, whose meaning can be easily guessed. Like schadenfreude, it is a compound noun composed of "smirk" (both a noun and verb) and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

Merriam-Webster defines "smirk" as

verb
: to smile in an unpleasant way because you are pleased with yourself, glad about someone else's trouble, etc.

What does the OP intend by calque?

A calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

An additional example would be the English term wisdom tooth and the Italian dente del giudizio, both are the calque of the Latin dēns sapientiae. Using the strict criteria set by the OP and its bounty benefactor, the "best etymological calque" of sapientia would not be wisdom, derived from Old High German wistuom, but instead sapience. Moreover, the Italian word giudizio (judgement) is not a cognate of sapentia but of Latin iudicium.

There is no rule, anywhere, that a calque must be formed by cognates. It's simply untrue, and the OP's quest is senseless and flawed. A much more realistic approach, from a linguistic point of view, would be to translate the loanword using common English words whose meaning are intuitive. Therefore, I suggest that to smirk at someone's mishap, translates the meaning of schadenfrude, rather neatly. It just so happens that "smirk" has Old English origins and is possibly derived from Proto-Germanic smarōną, while mishap (an unfortunate episode or accident) sounds Germanic but whose etymology is uncertain.

Smirkmishap

A 21st century candidate, whose meaning can be easily guessed. Like schadenfreude, it is a compound noun composed of "smirk" (both a noun and verb) and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

Merriam-Webster defines "smirk" as

verb
: to smile in an unpleasant way because you are pleased with yourself, glad about someone else's trouble, etc.

What does the OP intend by calque?

The word calque is derived from the French calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

An additional example would be the English term wisdom tooth and the Italian dente del giudizio, both are the calque of the Latin dēns sapientiae. Using the strict criteria set by the OP and its bounty benefactor, the "best etymological calque" of sapientia would not be wisdom, derived from Old High German wistuom, but instead sapience. Moreover, the Italian word giudizio (judgement) is not a cognate of sapentia but of Latin iudicium.

There is no rule, anywhere, that a calque must be formed by cognates. It's simply untrue, and the OP's quest is senseless and flawed. A much more realistic approach, from a linguistic point of view, would be to translate the loanword using common English words whose meaning are naturally intuitive. Therefore, to smirk at someone's mishap, translates the meaning of schadenfreude, rather neatly. It just so happens that "smirk" has Old English origins and is possibly derived from Proto-Germanic smarōną while the Germanic-sounding mishap is a compound word that incorporates the prefix mis- with the virtually obsolete and archaic hap, meaning "luck", "fortune". Hap dates back to Proto-Germanic *hap- (source of Old English gehæp "convenient, fit"), it is no longer used in the English language but its derivatives, hapless and mishap, have survived to the present-day.

3 added 1501 characters in body
source | link

Smirkmishap

A 21st century candidate, whose meaning can be easily guessed. Like schadenfreude, it is a compound noun composed of "smirk" (both a noun and verb) and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

Merriam-Webster defines "smirk" as

verb
: to smile in an unpleasant way because you are pleased with yourself, glad about someone else's trouble, etc.

What does the OP intend by calque?

A calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

An additional example would be the English term wisdom tooth and the Italian dente del giudizio, both are the calque of the Latin dēns sapientiae. Using the strict criteria set by the OP and its bounty benefactor, the "best etymological calque" of sapientia would not be wisdom, derived from Old High German wistuom, but instead sapience. Moreover, the Italian word giudizio (judgement) is not a cognate of sapentia but of Latin iudicium.

There is no rule, anywhere, that a calque must be formed by cognates. It's simply untrue, and the OP's quest is senseless and flawed. A much more realistic approach, from a linguistic point of view, would be to translate the loanword using common English words whose meaning are intuitive. Therefore, I suggest that to smirk at someone's mishap, translates the meaning of schadenfrude, rather neatly. It just so happens that "smirk" has Old English origins and is possibly derived from Proto-Germanic smarōną, while mishap (an unfortunate episode or accident) sounds Germanic but whose etymology is uncertain.

Smirkmishap

A compound noun composed of "smirk" and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

What does the OP intend by calque?

A calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

Smirkmishap

A 21st century candidate, whose meaning can be easily guessed. Like schadenfreude, it is a compound noun composed of "smirk" (both a noun and verb) and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

Merriam-Webster defines "smirk" as

verb
: to smile in an unpleasant way because you are pleased with yourself, glad about someone else's trouble, etc.

What does the OP intend by calque?

A calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

An additional example would be the English term wisdom tooth and the Italian dente del giudizio, both are the calque of the Latin dēns sapientiae. Using the strict criteria set by the OP and its bounty benefactor, the "best etymological calque" of sapientia would not be wisdom, derived from Old High German wistuom, but instead sapience. Moreover, the Italian word giudizio (judgement) is not a cognate of sapentia but of Latin iudicium.

There is no rule, anywhere, that a calque must be formed by cognates. It's simply untrue, and the OP's quest is senseless and flawed. A much more realistic approach, from a linguistic point of view, would be to translate the loanword using common English words whose meaning are intuitive. Therefore, I suggest that to smirk at someone's mishap, translates the meaning of schadenfrude, rather neatly. It just so happens that "smirk" has Old English origins and is possibly derived from Proto-Germanic smarōną, while mishap (an unfortunate episode or accident) sounds Germanic but whose etymology is uncertain.

2 added 345 characters in body
source | link

Smirkmishap

A compound noun composed of "smirk" and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

What does the OP intend by calque?

A calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

Smirkmishap

A compound noun composed of "smirk" and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

Smirkmishap

A compound noun composed of "smirk" and "mishap"

mishap
Middle English: from mis- + hap.

smirk
Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by smile.

What does the OP intend by calque?

A calque is derived from the French word, calque, and it means to translate literally word-for-word a foreign word or expression. For example, "Groundhog" may be a calque from Dutch "aertoercken."

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