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Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun. So not only a different word sense, but even a different part of speech.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun. So not only a different word sense, but even a different part of speech.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -
4 deleted 216 characters in body
source | link

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun. So not only a different word sense, but even a different part of speech.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun. So not only a different word sense, but even a different part of speech.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -
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3 edited title
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When onea single use of a word, has more than one word-sense at(or part of speech) in the same timesentence

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

New-paperNewspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun. So not only a different word sense, but even a different part of speech.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -

When one word, has more than one word-sense at the same time

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

New-paper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that that are not correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -

When a single use of a word has more than one word-sense (or part of speech) in the same sentence

Consider the sentence:

John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading."

(source)

Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a company:

John used to work for the newspaper

and the newspaper as the physical object:

the newspaper that you are reading.

It should be readily apparent that John never worked for that ink-on-died-wood-pulp in front of you. It should also be clear that you are not reading a company. In the first sentence though, the word takes both senses at the same time.

@Nigelj provided another example:

I was going to dust but there wasn't any

Here, dust is first used as a verb, then as a noun. So not only a different word sense, but even a different part of speech.

I am looking for a name for this occurrence, so I can look it up in a reference book / textbook. It is of interest to me as it is a case that is often neglected by computational word sense disambiguation systems.

Terms that I have already considered, and that are not (to my knowledge) correct for describing this:

  • polyseme / homonym : a word holding multiple senses at the same time can of-course only occur with words that have multiple senses in the first place. But not all uses of words with multiple senses exhibit the behavior.
  • Syntactic ambiguity/amphiboly/amphibology: this sentence is un-ambigious. It only has one interpretation.
  • Antanaclasis: the word newspaper is only used once, but with two meanings.
  • Pun: pun's generally rely on two different interpretations of the word, separately to give the sentence two possible meanings. Not at the same same time to give the sentence 1 meaning (also they tend to be funny)
  • -
2 added 153 characters in body
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