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Having checked the Oxford English Dictionary for turmoil, it turns out that it is derived from the Old French tremouille or mill-hopper. However, while there are both noun and verb forms of turmoil, there is no adjective which shares that etymology. So, I suggest turbidturbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.

Having checked the Oxford English Dictionary for turmoil, it turns out that it is derived from the Old French tremouille or mill-hopper. However, while there are both noun and verb forms of turmoil, there is no adjective which shares that etymology. So, I suggest turbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.

Having checked the Oxford English Dictionary for turmoil, it turns out that it is derived from the Old French tremouille or mill-hopper. However, while there are both noun and verb forms of turmoil, there is no adjective which shares that etymology. So, I suggest turbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.

2 added 259 characters in body
source | link

What aboutHaving checked the Oxford English Dictionary for turmoil, it turns out that it is derived from the Old French tremouille or mill-hopper. However, while there are both noun and verb forms of turmoil, there is no adjective which shares that etymology. So, I suggest turbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.

What about turbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.

Having checked the Oxford English Dictionary for turmoil, it turns out that it is derived from the Old French tremouille or mill-hopper. However, while there are both noun and verb forms of turmoil, there is no adjective which shares that etymology. So, I suggest turbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.

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What about turbid:

  1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque; obscured: the turbid waters near the waterfall.

  2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.

  3. confused; muddled; disturbed.