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POST WILL BE REWRITTEN WITH SOURCES AT A LATER DATE

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

POST WILL BE REWRITTEN WITH SOURCES AT A LATER DATE

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

POST WILL BE REWRITTEN WITH SOURCES AT A LATER DATE

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

3 added 57 characters in body
source | link

POST WILL BE REWRITTEN WITH SOURCES AT A LATER DATE

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

POST WILL BE REWRITTEN WITH SOURCES AT A LATER DATE

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

2 added 950 characters in body
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English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans.

English was a Germanic language (Modern English is a Romance language as 60% of its vocabulary is of Latin origin while 10% is still Germanic. So English lost its Germanic roots just as French and Norman did.) therefore it uses the Germanic name: English, and this comes from the Germanic words Engle, Engel, Englisc, Englisk, and Engleis.

Anglish is of Latin origin, comes from Anglii, Angla, Anglo, Angle, and Angles; and thus is not the correct name for the original German tribe that was part of an alliance (English, Frisian, Jute, and Saxon) to invade Britannia in terms of the Germanic languages.

There is zero reference of Anglo-Saxon until the modern era. It's a fake people and a fake language that never existed until 200 years ago.

The root word for English is all sourced from proto-Germanic, Old English, Old Saxon, and Gothic dictionaries and written text from the era from the Romans and Germans. Anybody who refers to themselves as Anglo-whatever should not be included with the Germanic race since they embraced Roman culture.

Here's a wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxons and in the second paragraph it mentions the etymology of the word "Anglo-Saxon". This should have been Englisc and Saexa in England (Britain) or Englisk and Sahsa in Saxony (northern Germany).

The Old English ethnonym "Angul-Seaxan" comes from the Latin Angli-Saxones and became the name of the peoples Bede calls Anglorum[9] and Gildas calls Saxones.[10] Anglo-Saxon is a term that was rarely used by Anglo-Saxons themselves; it is not an autonym. It is likely they identified as ængli, Seaxe or, more probably, a local or tribal name such as Mierce, Cantie, Gewisse, Westseaxe, or Norþanhymbre. Also, the use of Anglo-Saxon disguises the extent to which people identified as Anglo-Scandinavian after the Viking age, or as Anglo-Norman after the Norman conquest in 1066.[11]

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