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A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SEfrom travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shows results for "touristy" only for English.

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shows results for "touristy" only for English.

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shows results for "touristy" only for English.
    Question Protected by tchrist
5 fix typo
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A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shoesshows results for "touristy" only for English.

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shoes results for "touristy" only for English.

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shows results for "touristy" only for English.
4 some notes on my google ngram experiments
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A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shoes results for "touristy" only for English.

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic".

I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most of the English speaking countries and work in tourism.

But it's very very common to hear "touristic" from Europeans who speak very good English. Also at least on the web if not in printed media which I'm less aware of.

To me as an Australian the word to use is "touristy". It does sound more colloquial when I compare the two but it is used by all levels of society. Interestingly my web browser is marking "touristic" as wrong and accepting "touristy".

I have checked in dictionaries and both words are listed but they don't break down historic or demographic usage.

So is "touristic" Euroenglish or plain old normal English? Is it more or less formal / more or less artificial than "touristy"? Could it even be that they're not quite synonyms?

(Example usage from travel.SE: "During summer touristic places are open everywhere")

Since this has seemed to be a little controversial so far I did some Googling and found:

  • A thread on this topic on a site called Word Reference
  • Google Ngrams shows results for the English spelling "touristic" under three foreign European languages besides English but shoes results for "touristy" only for English.
3 add a link to a thread on word reference
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2 add word-usage tag
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