Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
8 added 151 characters in body
source | link

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. Earlier, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man (or woman for that matter), except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.) Don't think that such beliefs still persist. Indian people have a much more improved mindset now, and most women are educated and seek empowerment.

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. Earlier, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man (or woman for that matter), except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. Earlier, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man (or woman for that matter), except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.) Don't think that such beliefs still persist. Indian people have a much more improved mindset now, and most women are educated and seek empowerment.

7 added 474 characters in body
source | link

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. Earlier, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man (or woman for that matter), except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. Earlier, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man (or woman for that matter), except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

6 deleted 428 characters in body
source | link

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. In the 9th century, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man or woman for that matter, except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note...

Note that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Among the Muslims, it was even more popular. In the 9th century, Muslims practiced the Purdah and no Muslim girl was allowed see or talk to any man or woman for that matter, except her own mother and father (and after they're married off, their in-laws and husband). They were taught only to read Arbi and Farsi. They were not literate even in their own tongue. Hindu women, on the other hand, were educated to some extent, if not as much as their male counterparts.

Note that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

A 19th-century proverb from the Indian subcontinent:

Educating your girl is like watering another man's field.

(Several variations can be found online)

Meaning and context

This came to be when the male-dominated society was heavily biased against women empowerment. The point of this statement is that the education of girls is as unbeneficial and optional as watering another man's fields. Your girls aren't actually yours; they all have to go to another man's (father-in-law's and husband's) house at the end. If you educate your girl, all you're doing is enlightening someone, who is to be another man's property.

Note...

that it's not general and applies to only women. And it's more of a prejudice than a proverb. In addition, only people who understand the Indian culture will understand this. (By India, I mean the whole Indian subcontinent.)

5 added 396 characters in body
source | link
4 added 396 characters in body
source | link
3 added 177 characters in body
source | link
2 added 451 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link