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I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior"). If you have used her name shortly before (at the very least during the same 'turn' of speaking in a conversation), only then can a pronoun be used, especially in less formal conversations.

However, I'm not sure that is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think.

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing about someone who isn't a party into the conversation.

I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior"). If you have used her name shortly before (at the very least during the same 'turn' of speaking in a conversation), only then can a pronoun be used, especially in less formal conversations.

However, I'm not sure that is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think.

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing about someone who isn't a party in the conversation.

I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior"). If you have used her name shortly before (at the very least during the same 'turn' of speaking in a conversation), only then can a pronoun be used, especially in less formal conversations.

However, I'm not sure that is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think.

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing about someone who isn't a party to the conversation.

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I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior"). If you have used her name shortly before (at the very least during the same 'turn' of speaking in a conversation), only then can a pronoun be used, especially in less formal conversations.

However, I'm not sure thisthat is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think.

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing about someone who isn't a party in the conversation.

I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior").

However, I'm not sure this is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think.

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing.

I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior"). If you have used her name shortly before (at the very least during the same 'turn' of speaking in a conversation), only then can a pronoun be used, especially in less formal conversations.

However, I'm not sure that is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think.

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing about someone who isn't a party in the conversation.

3 added 6 characters in body
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I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior").

However, I'm not sure this is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think. 

In writing, howeverany case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing.

I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior").

However, I'm not sure this is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think. In writing, however, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper.

I believe proper etiquette demands that you should never refer by "he" or "she" to someone who is or is presumed to be taking part in the same conversation. You should use either "you" or a proper name or title ("Cleopatra", "His Majesty", "Mr Archimedes", "my superior").

However, I'm not sure this is the exact situation you encountered. And perhaps this bit of etiquette isn't as common as I think. 

In any case, I can't see how "she" should ever be improper in writing.

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