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In Italy we say "non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (= don't compare gold to tin!) when someone compares a (concrete or abstract) high-value thing to a low-value one.

For example:

Joe: "LaTeX è come Word" (= LaTeX is like Word)

Carla: "Per piacere, non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (=Please, don't compare gold to tin!)

Is there an English equivalent one?

Edit:

Replying to some criticism about my translation of "confondiamo", I'd like to point out that "confondere", literally, means "to confuse". However, in this case, I think that "to compare" makes a better idea.

Indeed, in Italian we have another idiom

non è tutto oro quel che luce

which is the exact translation of

all that glitters is not gold.

The expression

non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!

is used as a reply when someone puts on the same level two things with different value. Hence, I think that, in this case, "to compare" is more suitable than simply "to confuse".

In Italy we say "non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (= don't compare gold to tin!) when someone compares a (concrete or abstract) high-value thing to a low-value one.

For example:

Joe: "LaTeX è come Word" (= LaTeX is like Word)

Carla: "Per piacere, non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (=Please, don't compare gold to tin!)

Is there an English equivalent one?

In Italy we say "non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (= don't compare gold to tin!) when someone compares a (concrete or abstract) high-value thing to a low-value one.

For example:

Joe: "LaTeX è come Word" (= LaTeX is like Word)

Carla: "Per piacere, non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (=Please, don't compare gold to tin!)

Is there an English equivalent one?

Edit:

Replying to some criticism about my translation of "confondiamo", I'd like to point out that "confondere", literally, means "to confuse". However, in this case, I think that "to compare" makes a better idea.

Indeed, in Italian we have another idiom

non è tutto oro quel che luce

which is the exact translation of

all that glitters is not gold.

The expression

non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!

is used as a reply when someone puts on the same level two things with different value. Hence, I think that, in this case, "to compare" is more suitable than simply "to confuse".

3 Corrected term
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In Italy we say "non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (= don't compare gold to cantin!) when someone compares a (concrete or abstract) high-value thing to a low-value one.

For example:

Joe: "LaTeX è come Word" (= LaTeX is like Word)

Carla: "Per piacere, non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (=Please, don't compare gold to cantin!)

Is there an English equivalent one?

In Italy we say "non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (= don't compare gold to can!) when someone compares a (concrete or abstract) high-value thing to a low-value one.

For example:

Joe: "LaTeX è come Word" (= LaTeX is like Word)

Carla: "Per piacere, non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (=Please, don't compare gold to can!)

Is there an English equivalent one?

In Italy we say "non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (= don't compare gold to tin!) when someone compares a (concrete or abstract) high-value thing to a low-value one.

For example:

Joe: "LaTeX è come Word" (= LaTeX is like Word)

Carla: "Per piacere, non confondiamo l'oro con la tolla!" (=Please, don't compare gold to tin!)

Is there an English equivalent one?

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