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I can't say for sure, but the phenomenon you're talking about probably has Yiddish roots. The "schm" prefix is quite common in that language. Yiddish, by the way, has been defined as "The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian."

An example of a Yiddish word is schmendrick, which means a stupid person. It is likely derived from Hebrew for "fat person." Another example is the Yiddish word schmuck, which in English we might translate dick or tool, as in

He's such a dick!

Or,

He's such a tool!

Schmuck-head, a common derivative, is just a bit more graphic, if you know what I mean (wink, wink, nudge, nudge).

I can't say for sure, but the phenomenon you're talking about probably has Yiddish roots. The "schm" prefix is quite common in that language. Yiddish, by the way, has been defined as "The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian."

An example of a Yiddish word is schmendrick, which means a stupid person. It is likely derived from Hebrew for "fat person."

I can't say for sure, but the phenomenon you're talking about probably has Yiddish roots. The "schm" prefix is quite common in that language. Yiddish, by the way, has been defined as "The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian."

An example of a Yiddish word is schmendrick, which means a stupid person. It is likely derived from Hebrew for "fat person." Another example is the Yiddish word schmuck, which in English we might translate dick or tool, as in

He's such a dick!

Or,

He's such a tool!

Schmuck-head, a common derivative, is just a bit more graphic, if you know what I mean (wink, wink, nudge, nudge).

1
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I can't say for sure, but the phenomenon you're talking about probably has Yiddish roots. The "schm" prefix is quite common in that language. Yiddish, by the way, has been defined as "The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian."

An example of a Yiddish word is schmendrick, which means a stupid person. It is likely derived from Hebrew for "fat person."