2 fixed typos, left "Fater" intact b/c the OP clearly said he wasn't sure.
source | link

Great replies! I once took a course on Celtic languages and learned that there was a division between "p-Celtic" and "q-Celtic". I mention these thermsterms here, as I haven't seen them in the posting above (they might otnot be officilaofficial terms though). 

A clear example: in English we have Fatherfather, in Swedish we have Farfar, in German we have Fater Fater (I think), in French we have Pèrepère, and in Latin we have Paterpater.

I guess this is what is referred to as Grimm's Law above. Thanks for the lesson!

Great replies! I once took a course on Celtic languages and learned that there was a division between "p-Celtic" and "q-Celtic". I mention these therms here, as I haven't seen them in the posting above (they might ot be officila terms though). A clear example: in English we have Father, in Swedish we have Far, in German we have Fater (I think), in French we have Père, and in Latin we have Pater.

I guess this is what is referred to as Grimm's Law above. Thanks for the lesson!

Great replies! I once took a course on Celtic languages and learned that there was a division between "p-Celtic" and "q-Celtic". I mention these terms here, as I haven't seen them in the posting above (they might not be official terms though). 

A clear example: in English we have father, in Swedish we have far, in German we have Fater (I think), in French we have père, and in Latin we have pater.

I guess this is what is referred to as Grimm's Law above.

1
source | link

Great replies! I once took a course on Celtic languages and learned that there was a division between "p-Celtic" and "q-Celtic". I mention these therms here, as I haven't seen them in the posting above (they might ot be officila terms though). A clear example: in English we have Father, in Swedish we have Far, in German we have Fater (I think), in French we have Père, and in Latin we have Pater.

I guess this is what is referred to as Grimm's Law above. Thanks for the lesson!