3 Edited link names from "this" to mor apropriate names
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I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found Is the word bisemous acceptable? in thisChinese-forums and bisemous in thiswordow, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: Should you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.

I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found this and this, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: Should you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.

I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found Is the word bisemous acceptable? in Chinese-forums and bisemous in wordow, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: Should you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.

2 added 1 character in body
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I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found this and this, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: ShallShould you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.

I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found this and this, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: Shall you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.

I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found this and this, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: Should you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.

1
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Special case of Polysemous

I just read a paper which heavily used polysemous, which means (think like ancient Greeks: poly + meaning -> πολύ + σημασία -> πολύσημος -> polysemus, which I think is polysemous in plural, but polysemus is red-underlined, as not a word from my Mac.

However the paper use polysemous in place of "two meanings". That, in Greek, would result in δύο + σημασία -> disemous or maybe bisemous (you know, like bipolar means δι + πολικός -> δύο πόλους.

However both disemous and bisemous are ref-highlighted as wrong. After searching the Internet, I found this and this, which are a bit controversial, so I am heavily confused and I feel that these are not correct in English.

Is there a word (that follows the Greek root, thus the Latin, etc....) for two meanings? Like there is polysemous for many meanings.

Example:

Pythia's oracles had two meanings.

Find X such that I can now say:

Pythia's oracles were X.


Pythia was the "superstar" of The Oracle of Delphi in Ancient Greece. Her oracles were phrased in such a way that they were almost always correct, but the person that was asking for an oracle would interpret the oracle with the meaning that would be in its favor.

I clearly remember from school when one king (or leader) asked Pythia whether he should launch a massive attack to another Great Power of that times (imagine them like US vs Russia before some decades) and Pythia answered: Shall you launch the attack, a great power will be vanished, or something like that, so that oracle was correct, because whoever would lose the war, would be "vanished", but both sides were great at that time.