3 deleted 57 characters in body; edited title
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Why is If a “cooking show” is grammatical, butwhy not a “cooking book”?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The expressioninstances of cooking book did turn up on, which Google Ngrams but I discarded the results because the instances turned up, were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking showscooking shows, and cookery programmescookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both termstitles are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

To sum up, if cooking show, cooking class, cooking skills, and to a lesser extent, cooking writer are all acceptable, what is about cooking book that makes it sound so ‘weird’?

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookeryWhy is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English? rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?

  2. Although recipe books are about Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books, these publications are practically never referred to as . Is there a cooking booksgrammatical or semantic reason for this?. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

Why is “cooking show” grammatical, but not “cooking book”?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The expression cooking book did turn up on Google Ngrams but I discarded the results because the instances were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking shows, and cookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both terms are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

To sum up, if cooking show, cooking class, cooking skills, and to a lesser extent, cooking writer are all acceptable, what is about cooking book that makes it sound so ‘weird’?

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?

  2. Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

If a “cooking show” is grammatical, why not a “cooking book”?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The instances of cooking book, which Google Ngrams turned up, were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking shows, and cookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both titles are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

To sum up, if cooking show, cooking class, cooking skills, and to a lesser extent, cooking writer are all acceptable, what is about cooking book that makes it sound so ‘weird’?

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?

  2. Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

2 added 192 characters in body; edited tags
source | link

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The expression cooking book did turn up on Google Ngrams but I discarded the results because the instances were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking shows, and cookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both terms are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

To sum up, if cooking show, cooking class, cooking skills, and to a lesser extent, cooking writer are all acceptable, what is about cooking book that makes it sound so ‘weird’?

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?

    Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?

  2. Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

    Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The expression cooking book did turn up on Google Ngrams but I discarded the results because the instances were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking shows, and cookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both terms are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?
  2. Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The expression cooking book did turn up on Google Ngrams but I discarded the results because the instances were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking shows, and cookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both terms are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

To sum up, if cooking show, cooking class, cooking skills, and to a lesser extent, cooking writer are all acceptable, what is about cooking book that makes it sound so ‘weird’?

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?

  2. Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?

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Why is “cooking show” grammatical, but not “cooking book”?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've never taken a cookery class 3 in my life, but I have learnt a lot from TV cooks such as Jamie Oliver, Nigel Slater and Delia Smith, and I'm an avid fan of their cookery shows 4.

In numbers 2, 3, and 4, cookery can be substituted with cooking with no change in meaning, which suggests the two terms are virtually interchangeable. In fact, cookery is the skill or activity of preparing and cooking food while cooking is defined as the activity of preparing or cooking food by Cambridge Dictionaries.

Nevertheless, the best alternative for cookery book is the compound noun cookbook. The expression cooking book did turn up on Google Ngrams but I discarded the results because the instances were vanishingly rare, and mostly, false positives.

American English Ngram chart enter image description here

British English Ngram chart enter image description here

Since the 1970s, the expression food writer has superseded that of cookery writer, but cooking writer, although rare, is still used . See Ngram

When a cooking writer pens his autobiography it is invariably written with a freshly baked, rosy glow. Tales of baking at their mother's knee is what is expected.
Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger by Nigel Slater

The following graphs clearly illustrate the phenomenal boom of cooking shows, and cookery programmes in the last forty years or so. The BrEng corpus demonstrates that both terms are commonly used...

enter image description here

whereas the AmEng corpus displays a distinct preference for cooking show. The description cookery show barely makes a visible dent on the chart

enter image description here

Questions

  1. Why is the term cookery rarely used for TV shows and books in American English?
  2. Although recipe books are about cooking, these publications are practically never referred to as cooking books. Is there a grammatical or semantic reason for this?