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When the piece of text is read aloud, the word that marks the words that follow as reported speech. Consider your examples when read aloud without that - the words that follow "(that)" could be reported speech or direct quotes. In terms of style, that helps avoid this ambiguity.

The strong link between that and reported speech can sometimes also help provide some emotional distance between the messenger and the message. E.g., "Tom said you should go" vs "Tom said that you should go".

When the piece of text is read aloud, the word that marks the words that follow as reported speech. Consider your examples when read aloud without that - the words that follow "(that)" could be reported speech or direct quotes. In terms of style, that helps avoid this ambiguity.

When the piece of text is read aloud, the word that marks the words that follow as reported speech. Consider your examples when read aloud without that - the words that follow "(that)" could be reported speech or direct quotes. In terms of style, that helps avoid this ambiguity.

The strong link between that and reported speech can sometimes also help provide some emotional distance between the messenger and the message. E.g., "Tom said you should go" vs "Tom said that you should go".

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When the piece of text is read aloud, the word that marks the words that follow as reported speech. Consider your examples when read aloud without that - the words that follow "(that)" could be reported speech or direct quotes. In terms of style, that helps avoid this ambiguity.