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Understand, of course, that the literal text of what someone says, does not change when spoken with a heavy accent or mispronunciation. So, if you are quoting someone in a journalistic sense, you should always write their words exactly as the speaker intended, and with the correct spelling.

To do otherwise, is injecting your own opinion, making a caricature of the person, by exaggerating some aspect of how they happen to speak. However, if you're writing a fictional story, or even a non-fictional accounting of a real-life "character", you may wish to illustrate that individual's characteristic style of speaking.

Because there are so many possible accents or ways to mispronounce words, there are no official rules of how to achieve this — it's up to the author to decide how the spoken words sound, and how to write them down phonetically.

Depending on your own regional accent, certain variations that other people have may stand out to you more than others. If a beautiful picture is in the eye of the beholder, the perfect accent is in the ear of the listener. So use your ears, and write down what you hear.

To give you a real-life example, I live in an area of Massachusetts known for its strong regional accent. The mayor we had a few years ago, spoke it so well, that I saved a few voice mail recordings of alert messages he sent. YouHere are two that you can listen to one here:

      Mayor Ambrosino of Revere - announcement about snow emergency.

      Mayor Ambrosino of Revere - announcement about Wonderland parking garage.

There are severalmany words in the mayor's recordingrecordings that exemplify his authentic local accent. My favorite part of the message isNotably, when the mayor says:

" thisThere is no parking on emergency arteries. Cars parked on such arteries will be ticked and towed. "

     and

" This roadwork is a necessary part of the construction of the Wonderland parking garage. "

If I were to write that in a way that illustrates how it sounds to me, it would be:

" There is no paahking on emergency aahtahries. Caahs paahked on such aahtahries will be ticked and towed. "

     and

" this roadwork is a necessary paaht of the construction of the Wonderland paahking gaahradge "

So, it's really a subjective thing, but it should only be done when you're more concerned with expressing the sound of someone's speech, rather than the meaning of their spoken words.

Understand, of course, that the literal text of what someone says, does not change when spoken with a heavy accent or mispronunciation. So, if you are quoting someone in a journalistic sense, you should always write their words exactly as the speaker intended, and with the correct spelling.

To do otherwise, is injecting your own opinion, making a caricature of the person, by exaggerating some aspect of how they happen to speak. However, if you're writing a fictional story, or even a non-fictional accounting of a real-life "character", you may wish to illustrate that individual's characteristic style of speaking.

Because there are so many possible accents or ways to mispronounce words, there are no official rules of how to achieve this — it's up to the author to decide how the spoken words sound, and how to write them down phonetically.

Depending on your own regional accent, certain variations that other people have may stand out to you more than others. If a beautiful picture is in the eye of the beholder, the perfect accent is in the ear of the listener. So use your ears, and write down what you hear.

To give you a real-life example, I live in an area of Massachusetts known for its strong regional accent. The mayor we had a few years ago, spoke it so well, that I saved a few voice mail recordings of alert messages he sent. You can listen to one here:

      Mayor Ambrosino of Revere - announcement about Wonderland parking garage.

There are several words in the mayor's recording that exemplify his authentic local accent. My favorite part of the message is when the mayor says:

" this roadwork is a necessary part of the construction of the Wonderland parking garage "

If I were to write that in a way that illustrates how it sounds to me, it would be:

" this roadwork is a necessary paaht of the construction of the Wonderland paahking gaahradge "

So, it's really a subjective thing, but it should only be done when you're more concerned with expressing the sound of someone's speech, rather than the meaning of their spoken words.

Understand, of course, that the literal text of what someone says, does not change when spoken with a heavy accent or mispronunciation. So, if you are quoting someone in a journalistic sense, you should always write their words exactly as the speaker intended, and with the correct spelling.

To do otherwise, is injecting your own opinion, making a caricature of the person, by exaggerating some aspect of how they happen to speak. However, if you're writing a fictional story, or even a non-fictional accounting of a real-life "character", you may wish to illustrate that individual's characteristic style of speaking.

Because there are so many possible accents or ways to mispronounce words, there are no official rules of how to achieve this — it's up to the author to decide how the spoken words sound, and how to write them down phonetically.

Depending on your own regional accent, certain variations that other people have may stand out to you more than others. If a beautiful picture is in the eye of the beholder, the perfect accent is in the ear of the listener. So use your ears, and write down what you hear.

To give you a real-life example, I live in an area of Massachusetts known for its strong regional accent. The mayor we had a few years ago, spoke it so well, that I saved a few voice mail recordings of alert messages he sent. Here are two that you can listen to:

      Mayor Ambrosino of Revere - announcement about snow emergency.

      Mayor Ambrosino of Revere - announcement about Wonderland parking garage.

There are many words in the mayor's recordings that exemplify his authentic local accent. Notably, when the mayor says:

" There is no parking on emergency arteries. Cars parked on such arteries will be ticked and towed. "

     and

" This roadwork is a necessary part of the construction of the Wonderland parking garage. "

If I were to write that in a way that illustrates how it sounds to me, it would be:

" There is no paahking on emergency aahtahries. Caahs paahked on such aahtahries will be ticked and towed. "

     and

" this roadwork is a necessary paaht of the construction of the Wonderland paahking gaahradge "

So, it's really a subjective thing, but it should only be done when you're more concerned with expressing the sound of someone's speech, rather than the meaning of their spoken words.

1
source | link

Understand, of course, that the literal text of what someone says, does not change when spoken with a heavy accent or mispronunciation. So, if you are quoting someone in a journalistic sense, you should always write their words exactly as the speaker intended, and with the correct spelling.

To do otherwise, is injecting your own opinion, making a caricature of the person, by exaggerating some aspect of how they happen to speak. However, if you're writing a fictional story, or even a non-fictional accounting of a real-life "character", you may wish to illustrate that individual's characteristic style of speaking.

Because there are so many possible accents or ways to mispronounce words, there are no official rules of how to achieve this — it's up to the author to decide how the spoken words sound, and how to write them down phonetically.

Depending on your own regional accent, certain variations that other people have may stand out to you more than others. If a beautiful picture is in the eye of the beholder, the perfect accent is in the ear of the listener. So use your ears, and write down what you hear.

To give you a real-life example, I live in an area of Massachusetts known for its strong regional accent. The mayor we had a few years ago, spoke it so well, that I saved a few voice mail recordings of alert messages he sent. You can listen to one here:

      Mayor Ambrosino of Revere - announcement about Wonderland parking garage.

There are several words in the mayor's recording that exemplify his authentic local accent. My favorite part of the message is when the mayor says:

" this roadwork is a necessary part of the construction of the Wonderland parking garage "

If I were to write that in a way that illustrates how it sounds to me, it would be:

" this roadwork is a necessary paaht of the construction of the Wonderland paahking gaahradge "

So, it's really a subjective thing, but it should only be done when you're more concerned with expressing the sound of someone's speech, rather than the meaning of their spoken words.