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    Post Closed as "off-topic" by Mitch, user140086, NVZ, MetaEd, Phil Sweet
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In the sentence "We do have free will.", what doespart of speech is "free" stands for?

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In this sentence "We do have free will."," is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective?

Edit

I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you read "free-will", always as a single term.

Edit 2

This is not a question about the meaning of this expression, but the grammar classification of the words that compounds it. Of course the meaning and the context need to be taken in consideration, but it can be known by the wikipedia article. But i'mI'm asking the experts that know the meaning and it's common use, to help me classifying grammatically "free will", giving the classification of "free" and "will", within that context.

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective?

Edit

I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you read "free-will", always as a single term.

Edit 2

This is not a question about the meaning of this expression, but the grammar classification of the words that compounds it. Of course the meaning and the context need to be taken in consideration, but it can be known by the wikipedia article. But i'm asking the experts that know the meaning and it's common use, to help me classifying grammatically "free will", giving the classification of "free" and "will", within that context.

In this sentence "We do have free will," is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective?

I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you read "free-will", always as a single term.

This is not a question about the meaning of this expression, but the grammar classification of the words that compounds it. Of course the meaning and the context need to be taken in consideration, but it can be known by the wikipedia article. But I'm asking the experts that know the meaning and it's common use, to help me classifying grammatically "free will", giving the classification of "free" and "will", within that context.

3 added 506 characters in body
source | link

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective?

Edit

I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you read "free-will", always as a single term.

Edit 2

This is not a question about the meaning of this expression, but the grammar classification of the words that compounds it. Of course the meaning and the context need to be taken in consideration, but it can be known by the wikipedia article. But i'm asking the experts that know the meaning and it's common use, to help me classifying grammatically "free will", giving the classification of "free" and "will", within that context.

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective?

Edit

I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you read "free-will", always as a single term.

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective?

Edit

I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you read "free-will", always as a single term.

Edit 2

This is not a question about the meaning of this expression, but the grammar classification of the words that compounds it. Of course the meaning and the context need to be taken in consideration, but it can be known by the wikipedia article. But i'm asking the experts that know the meaning and it's common use, to help me classifying grammatically "free will", giving the classification of "free" and "will", within that context.

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