3 added 680 characters in body
source | link

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry "oh, oh" in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. /ˈʌˌəʊ/, U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

There is almost no difference with other interjections (ha ) expressing surprise or other emotions:

A natural exclamation found in Greek, Latin, most of the modern Romanic, and all the modern Germanic languages. The simple ha! is not recorded in Old English (which had however the ha ha! of laughter), but was used in Old French, and is frequently in English from c1300

Sometimes doubled, or preceded or followed by other interjections; as: (ha ha!, a ha!, ah ha!, †ha a!).

The higher pitch of the first vowel is due to the burst of emotion, then the muscles of the larynx relax and produce a falling intonation, it is a physiological mechanism and has little to do with meaning as supposed by John Lawler or Fumble-Fingers.

'oh', 'oh oh', 'ha', 'ha ha' have always existed (in all languages) and were very popular since XVI century and in the XX century the variants uh uh, uh oh are recorded. Here is an expression of disapproval (uh-uh, ha-ha) that sounds /ˈʌ ˌ?ʌ / , 'uh-oh' shows the different pronunciation and the slightly different meaning of 'alarm, that spells trouble'.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry "oh, oh" in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. , U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

There is almost no difference with other interjections (ha ) expressing surprise or other emotions:

A natural exclamation found in Greek, Latin, most of the modern Romanic, and all the modern Germanic languages. The simple ha! is not recorded in Old English (which had however the ha ha! of laughter), but was used in Old French, and is frequently in English from c1300

Sometimes doubled, or preceded or followed by other interjections; as: (ha ha!, a ha!, ah ha!, †ha a!).

The higher pitch of the first vowel is due to the burst of emotion, then the muscles of the larynx relax and produce a falling intonation, it is a physiological mechanism and has little to do with meaning as supposed by John Lawler or Fumble-Fingers.

'oh', 'oh oh', 'ha', 'ha ha' have always existed, 'uh-oh' shows the different pronunciation and the slightly different meaning of 'alarm, that spells trouble'.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry "oh, oh" in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. /ˈʌˌəʊ/, U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

There is almost no difference with other interjections (ha ) expressing surprise or other emotions:

A natural exclamation found in Greek, Latin, most of the modern Romanic, and all the modern Germanic languages. The simple ha! is not recorded in Old English (which had however the ha ha! of laughter), but was used in Old French, and is frequently in English from c1300

Sometimes doubled, or preceded or followed by other interjections; as: (ha ha!, a ha!, ah ha!, †ha a!).

The higher pitch of the first vowel is due to the burst of emotion, then the muscles of the larynx relax and produce a falling intonation, it is a physiological mechanism and has little to do with meaning as supposed by John Lawler or Fumble-Fingers.

'oh', 'oh oh', 'ha', 'ha ha' have always existed (in all languages) and were very popular since XVI century and in the XX century the variants uh uh, uh oh are recorded. Here is an expression of disapproval (uh-uh, ha-ha) that sounds /ˈʌ ˌ?ʌ / , 'uh-oh' shows the different pronunciation and the slightly different meaning of 'alarm, that spells trouble'.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'

2 added 918 characters in body
source | link

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry "oh, oh" in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. , U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

There is almost no difference with other interjections (ha ) expressing surprise or other emotions:

A natural exclamation found in Greek, Latin, most of the modern Romanic, and all the modern Germanic languages. The simple ha! is not recorded in Old English (which had however the ha ha! of laughter), but was used in Old French, and is frequently in English from c1300

Sometimes doubled, or preceded or followed by other interjections; as: (ha ha!, a ha!, ah ha!, †ha a!).

The higher pitch of the first vowel is due to the burst of emotion, then the muscles of the larynx relax and produce a falling intonation, it is a physiological mechanism and has little to do with meaning as supposed by John Lawler or Fumble-Fingers.

'oh', 'oh oh', 'ha', 'ha ha' have always existed, 'uh-oh' shows the different pronunciation and the slightly different meaning of 'alarm, that spells trouble'.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry oh, oh in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. , U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry "oh, oh" in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. , U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

There is almost no difference with other interjections (ha ) expressing surprise or other emotions:

A natural exclamation found in Greek, Latin, most of the modern Romanic, and all the modern Germanic languages. The simple ha! is not recorded in Old English (which had however the ha ha! of laughter), but was used in Old French, and is frequently in English from c1300

Sometimes doubled, or preceded or followed by other interjections; as: (ha ha!, a ha!, ah ha!, †ha a!).

The higher pitch of the first vowel is due to the burst of emotion, then the muscles of the larynx relax and produce a falling intonation, it is a physiological mechanism and has little to do with meaning as supposed by John Lawler or Fumble-Fingers.

'oh', 'oh oh', 'ha', 'ha ha' have always existed, 'uh-oh' shows the different pronunciation and the slightly different meaning of 'alarm, that spells trouble'.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'

1
source | link

The origin of uh-oh can be deduced/ understood if one reads the entry oh, oh in the revised and updated version of OED (2004), where that particular written form is not recorded even as a variant.

  • The interjection is first recorded in the XVI century (1569) expressing surprise with negative (pain, distress, regret, surprise, disapproval) or positive (delight) connotation and the pronunciation was: Brit. /ˈəʊˈˌəʊ/ , U.S. /ˈoʊˈˌoʊ/ .

  • A second sense of the interjection is recorded from 1944, in an American thriller, "expressing (*often to oneself *or confidentially) alarm, apprehension, dismay, realization of a difficulty, etc." and its pronunciation is slightly different and in BE the first vowel changes to : Brit. , U.S. /ˈəˌoʊ/

    (E. S. Gardner Case of Black-eyed Blonde xvi. 156 ) "Two police cars were closing in on them..‘Oh, oh!’ Della said under her breath".

OED does not record any variant uh oh but only oh,oh, oh-oh, nor the presence of a glottal stop even in the BE pronunciation

One is warranted to deduce that the new form of the interjection was later introduced to represent the change in the first vowel from oh /ˈəʊ/ to uh /ˈʌ/.

As to why and how this new usage emerged it is possible that it was made popular in the '40s by Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated cartoons. "Tweety Bird", where the canary utters it when threatened by the 'puddytat'