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The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015). Emphasis mine.]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of adverbsnouns formed from nounsadverbs in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since 1800. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)

The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015).]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of adverbs formed from nouns in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since 1800. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)

The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015). Emphasis mine.]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of nouns formed from adverbs in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since 1800. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)

2 deleted 5 characters in body
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The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015).]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of adverbs formed from nouns in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since the 1800s1800. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)

The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015).]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of adverbs formed from nouns in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since the 1800s. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)

The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015).]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of adverbs formed from nouns in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since 1800. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)

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source | link

The suffix '-ness' is defined in the OED as forming abstract nouns from adverbs:

Forming abstract nouns from adjectives, participles, adjectival phrases, and (more rarely) nouns, pronouns, verbs, and adverbs.

["-ness, suffix". OED Online. September 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126245?rskey=ibqMh4&result=4&isAdvanced=false (accessed November 06, 2015).]

The OED lexicographers do not example the particular case of adverbs formed from nouns in the historical quotes, but rather content themselves there by showing some of the nonce-uses attested since the 1800s. Such uses presumably include adverb-to-noun formations, because the suffix is used freely to form nouns; however, in all cases where an adverb has a corresponding adjectival form or sense, the adjective seems to be selected by preference as the noun-formative base.

Also, although perhaps it is a slantwise formation process, I found some evidence indicating that nouns are formed from the adverbs in verbal phrases (that is, verb+adverb):

Noun suffixes will form nouns from every type of word.
...
-er = object, agency or means performing the task of: fixer-upper, do-gooder; added to: verbal phrases (verb+adverb) ....

(From "Word formation process".)