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In late 18th-century racing, fast horses were laden with weights, to make races more even, and therefore more attractive for wagering. The practice was called handicapping, from a 17th Century lottery game named hand-in-cap, where the name of the winning player was literally pulled from a cap.

Handicapping, giving a strong player a disadvantage so as to make sports more competitive, spread to other sports, notably golf, but also go, chess, croquet, bowling, and polo. A match in which handicapping was used was called a handicap and that word began to refer to the disadvantage itself.

In the mid-20th century, as part of the ongoing euphemism treadmill about human physical and intellectual disabilities, "handicap" was adopted as the catch-all word for such disabilities.

Given this history, it is ironic that “an advantage given a handicapped person” is giving his opponent ana handicap.

In late 18th-century racing, fast horses were laden with weights, to make races more even, and therefore more attractive for wagering. The practice was called handicapping, from a 17th Century lottery game named hand-in-cap, where the name of the winning player was literally pulled from a cap.

Handicapping, giving a strong player a disadvantage so as to make sports more competitive, spread to other sports, notably golf, but also go, chess, croquet, bowling, and polo. A match in which handicapping was used was called a handicap and that word began to refer to the disadvantage itself.

In the mid-20th century, as part of the ongoing euphemism treadmill about human physical and intellectual disabilities, "handicap" was adopted as the catch-all word for such disabilities.

Given this history, it is ironic that “an advantage given a handicapped person” is giving his opponent an handicap.

In late 18th-century racing, fast horses were laden with weights, to make races more even, and therefore more attractive for wagering. The practice was called handicapping, from a 17th Century lottery game named hand-in-cap, where the name of the winning player was literally pulled from a cap.

Handicapping, giving a strong player a disadvantage so as to make sports more competitive, spread to other sports, notably golf, but also go, chess, croquet, bowling, and polo. A match in which handicapping was used was called a handicap and that word began to refer to the disadvantage itself.

In the mid-20th century, as part of the ongoing euphemism treadmill about human physical and intellectual disabilities, "handicap" was adopted as the catch-all word for such disabilities.

Given this history, it is ironic that “an advantage given a handicapped person” is giving his opponent a handicap.

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In late 18th-century racing, fast horses were laden with weights, to make races more even, and therefore more attractive for wagering. The practice was called handicapping, from a 17th Century lottery game named hand-in-cap, where the name of the winning player was literally pulled from a cap.

Handicapping, giving a strong player a disadvantage so as to make sports more competitive, spread to other sports, notably golf, but also go, chess, croquet, bowling, and polo. A match in which handicapping was used was called a handicap and that word began to refer to the disadvantage itself.

In the mid-20th century, as part of the ongoing euphemism treadmill about human physical and intellectual disabilities, "handicap" was adopted as the catch-all word for such disabilities.

Given this history, it is ironic that “an advantage given a handicapped person” is giving his opponent an handicap.