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I have a question concerning use of more in comparative sentences when used with adjectives.

I was more sadfurious about my cat's death than you thought I would be.

Usually, or always, when more is used with an adjective in a comparative sentence, this more should be placed before the adjective it modifies as above, according to many websites dealing with this comparative adjectives.

But some people said it is fine to use it after the adjective like this.

I was sadfurious about my cat's death more than you thought I would be.

To me, it doesn't make sense because if I put more after "sad" with no prepositional phrase between them, it sounds strange to my ear.

I was sadfurious more than you thought I would be.

So, is it OK to use it like that? And if yes, why is that?

I have a question concerning use of more in comparative sentences when used with adjectives.

I was more sad about my cat's death than you thought I would be.

Usually, or always, when more is used with an adjective in a comparative sentence, this more should be placed before the adjective it modifies as above, according to many websites dealing with this comparative adjectives.

But some people said it is fine to use it after the adjective like this.

I was sad about my cat's death more than you thought I would be.

To me, it doesn't make sense because if I put more after "sad" with no prepositional phrase between them, it sounds strange to my ear.

I was sad more than you thought I would be.

So, is it OK to use it like that? And if yes, why is that?

I have a question concerning use of more in comparative sentences when used with adjectives.

I was more furious about my cat's death than you thought I would be.

Usually, or always, when more is used with an adjective in a comparative sentence, this more should be placed before the adjective it modifies as above, according to many websites dealing with this comparative adjectives.

But some people said it is fine to use it after the adjective like this.

I was furious about my cat's death more than you thought I would be.

To me, it doesn't make sense because if I put more after "sad" with no prepositional phrase between them, it sounds strange to my ear.

I was furious more than you thought I would be.

So, is it OK to use it like that? And if yes, why is that?

1
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Comparative adjectives

I have a question concerning use of more in comparative sentences when used with adjectives.

I was more sad about my cat's death than you thought I would be.

Usually, or always, when more is used with an adjective in a comparative sentence, this more should be placed before the adjective it modifies as above, according to many websites dealing with this comparative adjectives.

But some people said it is fine to use it after the adjective like this.

I was sad about my cat's death more than you thought I would be.

To me, it doesn't make sense because if I put more after "sad" with no prepositional phrase between them, it sounds strange to my ear.

I was sad more than you thought I would be.

So, is it OK to use it like that? And if yes, why is that?