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i was reading aThe book called English grammar understanding the basic it say inEnglish Grammar: Understanding The Basics makes the bookfollowing declaration:

If you can use many with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use much with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

and alsoelsewhere, it saysays:

If you can use fewer with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use less with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

If you can use fewer with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use less with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

now let us takeConsider this example if i said "i: "I have less high schools in my area than in your area" by followingarea." According to the grammar rules above, high schools is none counta noncount noun but, far as iI know, it is a count nonenoun.

i was reading a book called English grammar understanding the basic it say in the book

If you can use many with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use much with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

and also it say

If you can use fewer with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use less with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

now let us take this example if i said "i have less high schools in my area than your area" by following the grammar high schools is none count but far as i know it is count none

The book English Grammar: Understanding The Basics makes the following declaration:

If you can use many with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use much with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

and elsewhere, it says:

If you can use fewer with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use less with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

Consider this example: "I have less high schools in my area than in your area." According to the grammar rules above, high schools is a noncount noun but, far as I know, it is a count noun.

    Post Closed as "duplicate" by Avon, rogermue, Andrew Leach of
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count noun "count noun" or non count noun"non-count noun" -- how to know the differentdifference?

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count noun or non count noun how to know the different

i was reading a book called English grammar understanding the basic it say in the book

If you can use many with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use much with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

and also it say

If you can use fewer with a noun (when it is pluralized), it’s a count noun. If you can use less with a noun, it’s a noncount noun.

now let us take this example if i said "i have less high schools in my area than your area" by following the grammar high schools is none count but far as i know it is count none