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3 added ngram links
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In AmE, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).

Here is an ngram chart for usage of these terms in British English:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=raising+children%2Crearing+children%2Cbringing+up+children%2C+bringing+children+up&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=18&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Craising%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Crearing%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20up%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20children%20up%3B%2Cc0

And here is the same comparison for American English: https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=raising+children%2Crearing+children%2Cbringing+up+children%2Cbringing+children+up&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=17&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Craising%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Crearing%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20up%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20children%20up%3B%2Cc0

In AmE, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).

In AmE, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).

Here is an ngram chart for usage of these terms in British English:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=raising+children%2Crearing+children%2Cbringing+up+children%2C+bringing+children+up&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=18&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Craising%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Crearing%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20up%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20children%20up%3B%2Cc0

And here is the same comparison for American English: https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=raising+children%2Crearing+children%2Cbringing+up+children%2Cbringing+children+up&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=17&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Craising%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Crearing%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20up%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cbringing%20children%20up%3B%2Cc0

2 Limited my answer to American English.
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In EnglishAmE, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).

In English, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).

In AmE, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).

1
source | link

In English, we usually say that plants grow (intransitive) or that someone grows them (transitive.)

However, when referring to children, we say they grow up (intransitive) or that their parents raise or rear them (transitive).