Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
4 add one
source | link

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go for broke, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. For example, the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. For example, the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go for broke, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. For example, the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

3 more logical prefer
source | link

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. They are often preceded by "might as well" to conveyFor example, the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. For example, the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

2 link and define
source | link

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

Phrases such as go the whole hog, go all out or go all the way mean to do something in whole rather than in part, and particularly to act without restraint. They are often preceded by "might as well" to convey the sense you want.

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog. — Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary defines:

go the whole hog (British, American & Australian) also go whole hog (American): to do something as completely as possible. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one. I went whole hog and had a huge steak and French fries.

1
source | link